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The Evolution and Impact of Unconditional Cash Transfers in South Africa

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  • Ingrid Woolard

    () (SALDRU, School of Economics, University of Cape Town)

  • Murray Leibbrandt

    () (SALDRU, School of Economics, University of Cape Town)

Abstract

At the time of the transition to democracy in 1994, the South African social security system was already notably well developed for a middle income country (Lund 1993; Van der Berg 1997; Case and Deaton 1998). This fact can be ascribed to the way in which the system developed under apartheid as a welfare state for whites which was then incrementally expanded under social and political pressure to incorporate other groups. Thus, at the advent of the new post-apartheid society some important planks for a social assistance system were in place. Since then, a set of policies have been implemented that have expanded this system substantially. Direct spending on cash transfers currently stands at 3.5 percent of GDP. This is more than twice the median spending of 1.4 percent of GDP across developing and transition economies (World Bank 2009).

Suggested Citation

  • Ingrid Woolard & Murray Leibbrandt, 2010. "The Evolution and Impact of Unconditional Cash Transfers in South Africa," SALDRU Working Papers 51, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
  • Handle: RePEc:ldr:wpaper:51
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    Cited by:

    1. Plagerson, Sophie. & Ulriksen, Marianne S., 2015. "Cash transfer programmes, poverty reduction and empowerment of women in South Africa," ILO Working Papers 994880883402676, International Labour Organization.
    2. Shweta Saini & Sameedh Sharma & Ashok Gulati & Siraj Hussain & Joachim von Braun, 2017. "Indian Food and Welfare Schemes: Scope for Digitization Towards Cash Transfers," Working Papers id:12033, eSocialSciences.
    3. Marito Garcia & Charity M. T. Moore, 2012. "The Cash Dividend : The Rise of Cash Transfer Programs in Sub-Saharan Africa," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2246, January.
    4. Waidler, Jennifer, 2016. "On the fungibility of public and private transfers: A mental accounting approach," MERIT Working Papers 060, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    5. Vimal Ranchhod, 2017. "Household responses to the cessation of grant income: The case of South Africa's Old Age Pension," SALDRU Working Papers 213, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
    6. Bozzoli, Carlos G., 2016. "Orphanhood and fertility in young adults: Evidence from South Africa," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 22(C), pages 190-200.
    7. Abel, Martin, 2013. "Unintended labour supply effects of cash transfer programmes: Evidence from South Africa's old age pension," SALDRU Working Papers 114, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
    8. Charles Meth, 2011. "How not to present poverty research results: The South African case," SALDRU Working Papers 61, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
    9. d'Agostino, Giorgio & Scarlato, Margherita & Napolitano, Silvia, 2016. "Do Cash Transfers Promote Food Security? The Case of the South African Child Support Grant," MPRA Paper 69177, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Murray Leibbrandt & James Levinsohn, 2014. "Fifteen Years On: Household Incomes in South Africa," NBER Chapters,in: African Successes, Volume I: Government and Institutions, pages 333-355 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. World Bank, 2012. "Protecting Poor and Vulnerable Households in Indonesia," World Bank Other Operational Studies 13810, The World Bank.

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