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Educational and Child Labour Impacts of Two Food-for-Education Schemes: Evidence from a Randomised Trial in Rural Burkina Faso-super- †

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  • Harounan Kazianga
  • Damien de Walque
  • Harold Alderman

Abstract

This paper uses a prospective randomised trial to assess the impact of two food-for-education schemes on education and child labour outcomes for children from low-income households in northern rural Burkina Faso. The two food-for-education programmes under consideration are, on the one hand, school meals where students are provided with lunch each school day, and, on the other hand, take-home rations which provide girls with 10 kg of cereal flour each month, conditional on 90% attendance rate. After the programme ran for one academic year, both programmes increased enrolment by 3–5 percentage points. The scores on mathematics improved for girls in both school meals and take-home rations villages. Conditional on enrolment, the interventions caused attendance to decrease, but this was mainly driven by lower attendance among new enrolees. The interventions also led to adjustment in child labour, with children (especially girls) with access to food-for-education programmes, in particular the take-home rations, shifting away from on farm labour and off-farm productive tasks which possibly are more incompatible with school hours. Copyright 2012 , Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Harounan Kazianga & Damien de Walque & Harold Alderman, 2012. "Educational and Child Labour Impacts of Two Food-for-Education Schemes: Evidence from a Randomised Trial in Rural Burkina Faso-super- †," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 21(5), pages -760, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:jafrec:v:21:y:2012:i:5:p:-760
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/jae/ejs010
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Martin Ravallion, 2003. "Measuring Aggregate Welfare in Developing Countries: How Well Do National Accounts and Surveys Agree?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 85(3), pages 645-652, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Farzana Afridi & Bidisha Barooah & Rohini Somanathan, 2016. "Student responses to the changing content of school meals in India," Working papers 264, Centre for Development Economics, Delhi School of Economics.
    2. Karthik Muralidharan & Nishith Prakash, 2017. "Cycling to School: Increasing Secondary School Enrollment for Girls in India," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 9(3), pages 321-350, July.
    3. Rohini Somanathan & Bidisha Barooah & Farzana Afridi, 2016. "The Mixture as Before? Student Responses to the Changing Content of School Meals in India," Working Papers id:10874, eSocialSciences.
    4. Kazianga, Harounan & de Walque, Damien & Alderman, Harold, 2014. "School feeding programs, intrahousehold allocation and the nutrition of siblings: Evidence from a randomized trial in rural Burkina Faso," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 15-34.
    5. repec:oup:ajagec:v:99:y:2017:i:1:p:34-54. is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Harounan Kazianga & Francis Makamu, 2017. "Crop Choice, School Participation, and Child Labor in Developing Countries: Cotton Expansion in Burkina Faso," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 99(1), pages 34-54.
    7. Chakraborty, Tanika & Jayaraman, Rajshri, 2016. "School Feeding and Learning Achievement: Evidence from India's Midday Meal Program," IZA Discussion Papers 10086, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Felipe Barrera-Osorio & Deon Filmer, 2016. "Incentivizing Schooling for Learning: Evidence on the Impact of Alternative Targeting Approaches," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 51(2), pages 461-499.
    9. Akresh, Richard & de Walque, Damien & Kazianga, Harounan, 2013. "Cash transfers and child schooling : evidence from a randomized evaluation of the role of conditionality," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6340, The World Bank.
    10. Pouirkèta Rita Nikiema, 2017. "Impact of school feeding programmes on educational outcomes: Evidence from dry cereals in schools in Burkina Faso," WIDER Working Paper Series 182, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    11. Tanika Chakraborty & Rajshri Jayaraman, 2016. "School Feeding and Learning Achievement: Evidence from India's Midday Meal Program," CESifo Working Paper Series 5994, CESifo Group Munich.

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