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Renate Hartwig

Personal Details

First Name:Renate
Middle Name:
Last Name:Hartwig
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pha773
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
http://renahartwig.com/

Affiliation

Department für Volkswirtschaftslehre
Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät
Georg-August-Universität Göttingen

Göttingen, Germany
http://www.economics.uni-goettingen.de/



Platz der Göttinger Sieben 3 - D-37073 Göttingen
RePEc:edi:vsgoede (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Gatzinsi,Justine & Hartwig,Renate Sieglinde & Mossman,Lindsay Suzanne & Francoise,Umutoni Marie & Roberte,Isimbi & Rawlings,Laura B., 2019. "How Household Characteristics Shape Program Access and Asset Accumulation : A Mixed Method Analysis of the Vision 2020 Umurenge Programme in Rwanda," Policy Research Working Paper Series 8759, The World Bank.
  2. Grimm, Michael & Hartwig, Renate, 2018. "Unblurring the Market for Vision Correction: A Willingness to Pay Experiment in Rural Burkina Faso," IZA Discussion Papers 11929, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  3. Bocoum, Fadima & Grimm, Michael & Hartwig, Renate & Zongo, Nathalie, 2017. "Nudging Households to Take Up Health Insurance: Evidence from a Randomized Experiment in Burkina Faso," IZA Discussion Papers 10744, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  4. Hartwig, R. & Sparrow, R.A. & Budiyati, S. & Yumna, A. & Warda, N. & Suryahadi, A. & Bedi, A.S., 2015. "Effects of decentralized health care financing on maternal care in Indonesia," ISS Working Papers - General Series 607, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
  5. Gehrke, Esther & Hartwig, Renate, 2015. "How can public works programmes create sustainable employment?," Discussion Papers 11/2015, German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE).
  6. Dafe, Florence & Hartwig, Renate & Janus, Heiner, 2013. "Post 2015: why the development finance debate needs to make the move from quantity to quality," Briefing Papers 22/2013, German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE).
  7. Grimm, Michael & Hartwig, Renate & Lay, Jann, 2013. "Does Forced Solidarity Hamper Investment in Small and Micro Enterprises?," IZA Discussion Papers 7229, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  8. Binagwaho, Agnes & Hartwig, Renate & Ingeri, Denyse & Makaka, Andrew, 2012. "Mutual health insurance and its contribution to improving child health in Rwanda," Passauer Diskussionspapiere, Volkswirtschaftliche Reihe V-66-12, University of Passau, Faculty of Business and Economics.
  9. Renate Hartwig & Michael Grimm, 2009. "An Assessment of the Effects of the 2002 Food Crisis on Children’s Health in Malawi," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 19, Courant Research Centre PEG.

Articles

  1. Baland, Jean-Marie & Guirkinger, Catherine & Hartwig, Renate, 2019. "Now or later? The allocation of the pot and the insurance motive in fixed roscas," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 140(C), pages 1-11.
  2. Renate Hartwig & Robert Sparrow & Sri Budiyati & Athia Yumna & Nila Warda & Asep Suryahadi & Arjun S. Bedi, 2019. "Effects of Decentralized Health-Care Financing on Maternal Care in Indonesia," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 67(3), pages 659-686.
  3. Bocoum, Fadima & Grimm, Michael & Hartwig, Renate & Zongo, Nathalie, 2019. "Can information increase the understanding and uptake of insurance? Lessons from a randomized experiment in rural Burkina Faso," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 220(C), pages 102-111.
  4. Gehrke, Esther & Hartwig, Renate, 2018. "Productive effects of public works programs: What do we know? What should we know?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 111-124.
  5. Grimm, Michael & Hartwig, Renate & Lay, Jann, 2017. "Does forced solidarity hamper investment in small and micro enterprises?," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(4), pages 827-846.
  6. Michael Grimm & Renate Hartwig & Jann Lay, 2013. "Electricity Access and the Performance of Micro and Small Enterprises: Evidence from West Africa," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 25(5), pages 815-829, December.
  7. Renate Hartwig & Michael Grimm, 2012. "An Assessment of the Effects of the 2002 Food Crisis on Children's Health in Malawi-super- †," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 21(1), pages 124-165, January.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Gehrke, Esther & Hartwig, Renate, 2015. "How can public works programmes create sustainable employment?," Discussion Papers 11/2015, German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE).

    Cited by:

    1. Nataliya P. Mokrytska & Mariya S. Dolynska & Iryna O. Revak, 2019. "Financing of Public Works as a Form of Temporary Legal Employment of Unemployed Citizens in Ukraine," International Journal of Economics & Business Administration (IJEBA), International Journal of Economics & Business Administration (IJEBA), vol. 0(2), pages 239-250.
    2. Camacho, Luis A. & Kreibaum, Merle, 2017. "Cash transfers, food security and resilience in fragile contexts: general evidence and the German experience," Discussion Papers 9/2017, German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE).
    3. Altenburg, Tilman, 2017. "Arbeitsplatzoffensive für Afrika," Discussion Papers 23/2017, German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE).

  2. Dafe, Florence & Hartwig, Renate & Janus, Heiner, 2013. "Post 2015: why the development finance debate needs to make the move from quantity to quality," Briefing Papers 22/2013, German Development Institute / Deutsches Institut für Entwicklungspolitik (DIE).

    Cited by:

    1. Towfiqul Islam Khan & Mashfique Ibne Akbar, 2015. "Illicit Financial Flow in view of Financing the Post-2015 Development Agenda," Southern Voice Occasional Paper 25, Southern Voice.

  3. Grimm, Michael & Hartwig, Renate & Lay, Jann, 2013. "Does Forced Solidarity Hamper Investment in Small and Micro Enterprises?," IZA Discussion Papers 7229, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Baland, Jean-Marie & Bonjean, Isabelle & Guirkinger, Catherine & Ziparo, Roberta, 2015. "The economic consequences of mutual help in extended families," CEPR Discussion Papers 10945, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Marie Boltz & Karine Marazyan & Paola Villar, 2019. "Income hiding and informal redistribution: A lab-in-the-field experiment in Senegal," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-02377013, HAL.
    3. Nguyen, Huu Chi & Nordman, Christophe Jalil, 2017. "Household Entrepreneurship and Social Networks: Panel Data Evidence from Vietnam," IZA Discussion Papers 10482, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Alger, Ingela & Weibull, Jörgen W., 2018. "Evolutionary Models of Preference Formation," TSE Working Papers 18-955, Toulouse School of Economics (TSE).
    5. Fiala, Nathan., 2015. "Access to finance and enterprise growth : evidence from an experiment in Uganda," ILO Working Papers 994874063402676, International Labour Organization.
    6. Hanna Fromell & Daniele Nosenzo & Trudy Owens & Fabio Tufano, 2019. "One Size Doesn’t Fit All: Plurality of Social Norms and Saving Behavior in Kenya," Discussion Papers 2019-12, The Centre for Decision Research and Experimental Economics, School of Economics, University of Nottingham.
    7. Fiala, Nathan, 2018. "Returns to microcredit, cash grants and training for male and female microentrepreneurs in Uganda," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 189-200.
    8. Gehrke, Esther & Grimm, Michael, 2014. "Do Cows Have Negative Returns? The Evidence Revisited," IZA Discussion Papers 8525, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    9. Nathan Fiala, 2012. "The Economic Consequences of Forced Displacement," HiCN Working Papers 137, Households in Conflict Network.
    10. Alger, Ingela & Juarez, Laura & Juarez-Torres, Miriam & Miquel-Florensa, Josepa, 2016. "Do informal transfers induce lower efforts? Evidence from lab-in-the-field experiments in rural Mexico," IAST Working Papers 16-34, Institute for Advanced Study in Toulouse (IAST), revised Sep 2018.
    11. Jean-Philippe Berrou & François Combarnous, 2018. "Beyond Solidarity and Accumulation Networks in Urban Informal African Economies," Post-Print halshs-02280369, HAL.
    12. Klohn, Florian & Strupat, Christoph, 2013. "Crowding out of Solidarity? – Public Health Insurance versus Informal Transfer Networks in Ghana," Ruhr Economic Papers 432, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    13. Nathan Fiala, 2017. "Business is Tough, but Family is Worse: Household Bargaining and Investment in Microenterprises in Uganda," Working papers 2017-05, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    14. Jérôme Ballet, 2018. "Anthropology and Economics: The Argument for a Microeconomic Anthropology," Cahiers du GREThA (2007-2019) 2018-14, Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée (GREThA).

  4. Binagwaho, Agnes & Hartwig, Renate & Ingeri, Denyse & Makaka, Andrew, 2012. "Mutual health insurance and its contribution to improving child health in Rwanda," Passauer Diskussionspapiere, Volkswirtschaftliche Reihe V-66-12, University of Passau, Faculty of Business and Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. World Bank Group, 2015. "Rwanda Poverty Assessment," World Bank Other Operational Studies 22970, The World Bank.
    2. Lisa Bagnoli, 2017. "Does National Health Insurance Improve Children's Health ?National and Regional Evidence from Ghana," Working Papers ECARES ECARES 2017-03, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    3. Shimeles Abebe & Andinet Woldemichael, 2015. "Working Paper 225 - Measuring the Impact of Micro-Health Insurance on Healthcare Utilization: A Bayesian Potential Outcomes Approach," Working Paper Series 2166, African Development Bank.

  5. Renate Hartwig & Michael Grimm, 2009. "An Assessment of the Effects of the 2002 Food Crisis on Children’s Health in Malawi," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 19, Courant Research Centre PEG.

    Cited by:

Articles

  1. Baland, Jean-Marie & Guirkinger, Catherine & Hartwig, Renate, 2019. "Now or later? The allocation of the pot and the insurance motive in fixed roscas," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 140(C), pages 1-11.

    Cited by:

    1. Adnan Shoaib & Muhammad Ayub Siddiqui, 2020. "Why do people participate in ROSCA saving schemes? Findings from a qualitative empirical study," DECISION: Official Journal of the Indian Institute of Management Calcutta, Springer;Indian Institute of Management Calcutta, vol. 47(2), pages 177-189, June.

  2. Gehrke, Esther & Hartwig, Renate, 2018. "Productive effects of public works programs: What do we know? What should we know?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 107(C), pages 111-124.

    Cited by:

    1. Jules Gazeaud & Eric Mvukiyehe & Olivier Sterck, 2019. "Cash Transfers and Migration: Theory and Evidence from a Randomized Controlled Trial," CSAE Working Paper Series 2019-16, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    2. Nataliya P. Mokrytska & Mariya S. Dolynska & Iryna O. Revak, 2019. "Financing of Public Works as a Form of Temporary Legal Employment of Unemployed Citizens in Ukraine," International Journal of Economics & Business Administration (IJEBA), International Journal of Economics & Business Administration (IJEBA), vol. 0(2), pages 239-250.
    3. Jules Gazeaud & Victor Stephane, 2020. "Productive workfare? Evidence from Ethiopia’s productive safety net program," NOVAFRICA Working Paper Series wp2003, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Faculdade de Economia, NOVAFRICA.
    4. Karim, Azreen & Noy, Ilan, 2020. "Risk, poverty or politics? The determinants of subnational public spending allocation for adaptive disaster risk reduction in Bangladesh," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 129(C).

  3. Grimm, Michael & Hartwig, Renate & Lay, Jann, 2017. "Does forced solidarity hamper investment in small and micro enterprises?," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(4), pages 827-846.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Michael Grimm & Renate Hartwig & Jann Lay, 2013. "Electricity Access and the Performance of Micro and Small Enterprises: Evidence from West Africa," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 25(5), pages 815-829, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Christopher Ksoll & Kristine Bos & Arif Mamun & Anthony Harris & Sarah Hughes, "undated". "Evaluation Design Report for the Benin Power Compact's Electricity Generation Project and Electricity Distribution Project," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 9f8974513ee745aaac3b5c62e, Mathematica Policy Research.
    2. Lenz, Luciane & Munyehirwe, Anicet & Peters, Jörg & Sievert, Maximiliane, 2017. "Does Large-Scale Infrastructure Investment Alleviate Poverty? Impacts of Rwanda’s Electricity Access Roll-Out Program," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 88-110.
    3. Duncan Chaplin & Delia Welsh & Arif Mamun & Nick Ingwersen & Kristine Bos & Erin Crossett & Poonam Ravindranath & Dara Bernstein & William Derbyshire, "undated". "Ghana Power Compact: Evaluation Design Report," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 8c1896c6f9af45f08347287c1, Mathematica Policy Research.
    4. Falentina, Anna T. & Resosudarmo, Budy P., 2019. "The impact of blackouts on the performance of micro and small enterprises: Evidence from Indonesia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 124(C), pages 1-1.
    5. Lisa CHAUVET & Alvaro DE MIGUEL TORRES & Alexa TIEMANN, 2018. "Electricity and manufacturing firm profits in Myanmar," Working Papers P214, FERDI.
    6. Houngbonon, Georges V. & Le Quentrec, Erwan, 2019. "Access to Electricity and ICT Usage: A Country-level Assessment on Sub-Saharan Africa," 2nd Europe – Middle East – North African Regional ITS Conference, Aswan 2019: Leveraging Technologies For Growth 201728, International Telecommunications Society (ITS).
    7. Pueyo, Ana & Carreras, Marco & Ngoo, Gisela, 2020. "Exploring the linkages between energy, gender, and enterprise: Evidence from Tanzania," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 128(C).
    8. Steckel, Jan Christoph & Rao, Narasimha D. & Jakob, Michael, 2017. "Access to infrastructure services: Global trends and drivers," Utilities Policy, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 109-117.

  5. Renate Hartwig & Michael Grimm, 2012. "An Assessment of the Effects of the 2002 Food Crisis on Children's Health in Malawi-super- †," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 21(1), pages 124-165, January.

    Cited by:

    1. Channing Arndt & M. Azhar Hussain & Lars Peter Østerdal, 2012. "Effects of Food Price Shocks on Child Malnutrition," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2012-089, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    2. Matthias Kalkuhl & Lukas Kornher & Marta Kozicka & Pierre Boulanger & Maximo Torero, 2013. "Conceptual framework on price volatility and its impact on food and nutrition security in the short term," FOODSECURE Working papers 15, LEI Wageningen UR.
    3. Arndt, Channing & Hussain, M. Azhar & Salvucci, Vincenzo & Østerdal, Lars Peter, 2016. "Effects of food price shocks on child malnutrition: The Mozambican experience 2008/2009," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 22(C), pages 1-13.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 8 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-DEV: Development (5) 2010-01-16 2012-12-06 2016-02-23 2017-05-21 2020-03-23. Author is listed
  2. NEP-AFR: Africa (4) 2010-01-16 2010-10-16 2012-12-06 2013-03-16
  3. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (4) 2012-12-06 2016-02-23 2017-05-21 2018-12-10
  4. NEP-IAS: Insurance Economics (3) 2012-12-06 2013-03-16 2017-05-21
  5. NEP-MFD: Microfinance (3) 2012-12-06 2013-03-16 2017-05-21
  6. NEP-EXP: Experimental Economics (2) 2017-05-21 2018-12-10
  7. NEP-AGR: Agricultural Economics (1) 2018-12-10
  8. NEP-DCM: Discrete Choice Models (1) 2018-12-10
  9. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (1) 2012-12-06
  10. NEP-ENT: Entrepreneurship (1) 2013-03-16
  11. NEP-SEA: South East Asia (1) 2016-02-23

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