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Christoph Albert

Personal Details

First Name:Christoph
Middle Name:
Last Name:Albert
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pal957
http://christophalbert.weebly.com

Affiliation

Collegio Carlo Alberto
Università degli Studi di Torino

Torino, Italy
https://www.carloalberto.org/
RePEc:edi:fccaait (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Christoph Albert & Paula Bustos & Jacopo Ponticelli, 2021. "The Effects of Climate Change on Labor and Capital Reallocation," NBER Working Papers 28995, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Christoph Albert & Albrecht Glitz & Joan Llull, 2021. "Labor Market Competition and the Assimilation of Immigrants," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 2125, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  3. Christoph Albert & Andrea Caggese & Beatriz González, 2020. "The short- and long-run employment impact of COVID-19 through the effects of real and financial shocks on new firms," Working Papers 2039, Banco de España.
  4. Christoph Albert & Joan Monràs, 2020. "The Regional Impact of Economic Shocks: Why Immigration is Different from Import Competition," Working Papers 1223, Barcelona School of Economics.
  5. Christoph Albert & Andrea Caggese, 2018. "Financial Frictions, Cyclical Fluctuations and the Innovative Nature of New Firms," 2018 Meeting Papers 815, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  6. Christoph Albert & Andrea Caggese, 2018. "Cyclical Fluctuations, Financial Shocks, and the Entry of Fast-Growing Entrepreneurial Startups," Working Papers 1067, Barcelona School of Economics.
  7. Albert, Christoph & Monras, Joan, 2018. "Immigration and Spatial Equilibrium: the Role of Expenditures in the Country of Origin," CEPR Discussion Papers 12842, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  8. Christoph Albert, 2017. "The Labor Market Impact of Undocumented Immigrants: Job Creation vs. Job Competition," CESifo Working Paper Series 6575, CESifo.
  9. Christoph Albert & Joan Monras, 2017. "Immigrants' Residential Choices and their Consequences," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1707, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.

Articles

  1. Christoph Albert, 2021. "The Labor Market Impact of Immigration: Job Creation versus Job Competition," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 13(1), pages 35-78, January.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

RePEc Biblio mentions

As found on the RePEc Biblio, the curated bibliography of Economics:
  1. Christoph Albert & Andrea Caggese & Beatriz González, 2020. "The short- and long-run employment impact of COVID-19 through the effects of real and financial shocks on new firms," Working Papers 2039, Banco de España.

    Mentioned in:

    1. > Economics of Welfare > Health Economics > Economics of Pandemics > Specific pandemics > Covid-19 > Long-term consequences

Wikipedia or ReplicationWiki mentions

(Only mentions on Wikipedia that link back to a page on a RePEc service)
  1. Christoph Albert, 2021. "The Labor Market Impact of Immigration: Job Creation versus Job Competition," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 13(1), pages 35-78, January.

    Mentioned in:

    1. The Labor Market Impact of Immigration: Job Creation versus Job Competition (AEJ:MA 2021) in ReplicationWiki ()

Working papers

  1. Christoph Albert & Albrecht Glitz & Joan Llull, 2021. "Labor Market Competition and the Assimilation of Immigrants," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 2125, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.

    Cited by:

    1. Christian Dustmann & Hyejin Ku & Tanya Surovtseva, 2021. "Real Exchange Rates and the Earnings of Immigrants," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 2110, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    2. Serdar Birinci & Fernando Leibovici & Kurt See, 2021. "The Allocation of Immigrant Talent: Macroeconomic Implications for the U.S. and Across Countries," Working Papers 2021-004, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, revised Jun 2022.
    3. Joan Llull, 2021. "Immigration and Gender Differences in the Labor Market," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 2102, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    4. Serdar Birinci & Fernando Leibovici & Kurt See, 2021. "Immigrant Misallocation," LIS Working papers 809, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    5. Illing, Hannah & Koch, Theresa, 2021. "Who Suffers the Greatest Loss? Costs of Job Displacement for Migrants and Natives," IAB-Discussion Paper 202108, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].

  2. Christoph Albert & Andrea Caggese & Beatriz González, 2020. "The short- and long-run employment impact of COVID-19 through the effects of real and financial shocks on new firms," Working Papers 2039, Banco de España.

    Cited by:

    1. Alejandro Fernández-Cerezo & Beatriz González & Mario Izquierdo & Enrique Moral-Benito, 2021. "Firm-level heterogeneity in the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic," Working Papers 2120, Banco de España.
    2. Davide Melcangi & Javier Turen, 2021. "Subsidizing Startups under Imperfect Information," Staff Reports 995, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    3. Miraj Ahmed Bhuiyan & Tiziana Crovella & Annarita Paiano & Helena Alves, 2021. "A Review of Research on Tourism Industry, Economic Crisis and Mitigation Process of the Loss: Analysis on Pre, During and Post Pandemic Situation," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 13(18), pages 1-27, September.

  3. Christoph Albert & Andrea Caggese, 2018. "Cyclical Fluctuations, Financial Shocks, and the Entry of Fast-Growing Entrepreneurial Startups," Working Papers 1067, Barcelona School of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Smirnyagin, Vladimir, 2020. "Compositional nature of firm growth and aggregate fluctuations," Bank of England working papers 846, Bank of England.
    2. Christoph Albert & Andrea Caggese & Beatriz González, 2020. "The short- and long-run employment impact of Covid-19 through the effects of real and financial shocks on new firms," Economics Working Papers 1739, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.

  4. Albert, Christoph & Monras, Joan, 2018. "Immigration and Spatial Equilibrium: the Role of Expenditures in the Country of Origin," CEPR Discussion Papers 12842, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

    Cited by:

    1. David Albouy & Alex Chernoff & Chandler Lutz & Casey Warman, 2019. "Local Labor Markets in Canada and the United States," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 37(S2), pages 533-594.
    2. Christian Dustmann & Hyejin Ku & Tanya Surovtseva, 2021. "Real Exchange Rates and the Earnings of Immigrants," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 2110, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    3. Serdar Birinci & Fernando Leibovici & Kurt See, 2021. "The Allocation of Immigrant Talent: Macroeconomic Implications for the U.S. and Across Countries," Working Papers 2021-004, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, revised Jun 2022.
    4. Yuan Tian & Maria Esther Caballero & Brian K. Kovak, 2020. "Social Learning along International Migrant Networks," NBER Working Papers 27679, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Davis, Donald R. & Dingel, Jonathan I., 2020. "The comparative advantage of cities," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 123(C).
    6. Joan Monràs & Javier Vázquez-Grenno & Ferran Elias, 2020. "Understanding the effects of granting work permits to undocumented immigrants," Economics Working Papers 1762, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    7. Davide Fiaschi & Cristina Tealdi, 2021. "Winners and losers of immigration," Papers 2107.06544, arXiv.org, revised Aug 2021.
    8. Goerlach, Joseph-Simon, 2021. "Borrowing Constraints and the Dynamics of Return and Repeat Migration," IZA Discussion Papers 14817, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    9. Serdar Birinci & Fernando Leibovici & Kurt See, 2021. "Immigrant Misallocation," LIS Working papers 809, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    10. Christoph Albert & Joan Monràs, 2020. "The Regional Impact of Economic Shocks: Why Immigration is Different from Import Competition," Working Papers 1223, Barcelona School of Economics.
    11. Mike Zabek, 2019. "Local Ties in Spatial Equilibrium," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2019-080, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    12. Jérôme Adda & Christian Dustmann & Joseph-Simon Görlach, 2021. "The Dynamics of Return Migration, Human Capital Accumulation, and Wage Assimilation," CESifo Working Paper Series 9051, CESifo.
    13. Gaetano Basso & Giovanni Peri, 2020. "Internal Mobility: The Greater Responsiveness of Foreign-Born to Economic Conditions," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 34(3), pages 77-98, Summer.

  5. Christoph Albert, 2017. "The Labor Market Impact of Undocumented Immigrants: Job Creation vs. Job Competition," CESifo Working Paper Series 6575, CESifo.

    Cited by:

    1. Amior, Michael & Manning, Alan, 2020. "Monopsony and the wage effects of migration," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 108454, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Michael Amior, 2018. "The contribution of foreign migration to local labor market adjustment," CEP Discussion Papers dp1582, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    3. Borjas, George J. & Cassidy, Hugh, 2020. "The Adverse Effect of the COVID-19 Labor Market Shock on Immigrant Employment," IZA Discussion Papers 13277, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Sarbini & Slamet Suhartono & Sri Setyadji & Hufron, 2021. "Legal protection of transferred workers after the enabling of the creation law of work," Technium Social Sciences Journal, Technium Science, vol. 20(1), pages 302-307, June.
    5. Borjas, George J. & Cassidy, Hugh, 2019. "The wage penalty to undocumented immigration," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(C).

  6. Christoph Albert & Joan Monras, 2017. "Immigrants' Residential Choices and their Consequences," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1707, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.

    Cited by:

    1. Monras, Joan & Vázquez-Grenno, Javier & Elias Moreno, Ferran, 2017. "Understanding the Effects of Legalizing Undocumented Immigrants," IZA Discussion Papers 10687, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. David Albouy & Heepyung Cho & Mariya Shappo, 2021. "Immigration and the pursuit of amenities," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(1), pages 5-29, January.
    3. Amior, Michael, 2020. "Immigration, local crowd-out and undercoverage bias," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 108490, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

Articles

  1. Christoph Albert, 2021. "The Labor Market Impact of Immigration: Job Creation versus Job Competition," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 13(1), pages 35-78, January.

    Cited by:

    1. Nicolo Maffei-Faccioli & Eugenia Vella, 2021. "Does Immigration Grow the Pie? Asymmetric Evidence from Germany," DEOS Working Papers 2105, Athens University of Economics and Business.
    2. Ismael Gálvez-Iniesta & José L. Groizard, 2021. "Undocumented Migration and Electoral Support: Evidence From Spain," Politics and Governance, Cogitatio Press, vol. 9(4), pages 196-209.
    3. Andri Chassamboulli & Idriss Fontaine & Andri Chassamboulli & Ismael Galvez-Iniesta & Pedro Gomes, 2022. "Immigration and Labour Market Flows," TEPP Working Paper 2022-12, TEPP.
    4. Michael A. Clemens, 2021. "The Fiscal Effect of Immigration: Reducing Bias in Influential Estimates," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 2134, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    5. David Rodriguez-Justicia & Bernd Theilen, 2022. "Immigration and tax morale: the role of perceptions and prejudices," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 62(4), pages 1801-1832, April.
    6. Damiano Pregaldini & Uschi Backes-Gellner, 2021. "How Middle-Skilled Workers Adjust to Immigration: The Role of Occupational Skill Specificity," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0193, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
    7. Lacava, Chiara, 2021. "Matching and sorting across regions," ICIR Working Paper Series 44/21, Goethe University Frankfurt, International Center for Insurance Regulation (ICIR).
    8. Francesc Ortega, 2021. "Occupational Barriers and the Productivity Penalty from Lack of Legal Status," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 2118, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 17 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (9) 2017-10-15 2017-11-05 2017-11-12 2018-04-30 2021-07-19 2021-08-16 2021-08-23 2021-08-30 2021-09-20. Author is listed
  2. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (9) 2017-10-15 2017-11-05 2017-11-12 2018-04-30 2020-12-21 2021-08-16 2021-08-23 2021-08-30 2021-09-20. Author is listed
  3. NEP-MIG: Economics of Human Migration (7) 2017-10-15 2017-11-05 2017-11-12 2018-04-30 2020-12-21 2021-07-19 2021-08-16. Author is listed
  4. NEP-ENT: Entrepreneurship (5) 2018-08-20 2019-01-14 2019-01-21 2020-09-14 2021-01-04. Author is listed
  5. NEP-INT: International Trade (5) 2020-12-21 2021-08-16 2021-08-23 2021-08-30 2021-09-20. Author is listed
  6. NEP-ISF: Islamic Finance (4) 2021-08-16 2021-08-23 2021-08-30 2021-09-20
  7. NEP-SBM: Small Business Management (4) 2018-08-20 2019-01-14 2019-01-21 2021-01-04
  8. NEP-GEO: Economic Geography (3) 2017-10-15 2020-12-21 2021-07-19
  9. NEP-FDG: Financial Development & Growth (2) 2019-01-14 2019-01-21
  10. NEP-LMA: Labor Markets - Supply, Demand, & Wages (2) 2019-01-14 2020-09-14
  11. NEP-CFN: Corporate Finance (1) 2021-01-04
  12. NEP-DGE: Dynamic General Equilibrium (1) 2017-11-05
  13. NEP-ENV: Environmental Economics (1) 2021-07-19
  14. NEP-INO: Innovation (1) 2018-08-20
  15. NEP-LAM: Central & South America (1) 2021-07-19
  16. NEP-LTV: Unemployment, Inequality & Poverty (1) 2017-11-05

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