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Immigration, Legal Status and Fiscal Impact

Author

Listed:
  • Andri Chassamboulli
  • Xiangbo Liu

Abstract

How do legal and illegal immigrants affect the fiscal balance and welfare of natives in the host country? To answer this question we develop a general equilibrium model with search frictions in the labor market that accounts for both the direct net contribution of immigrants to the fiscal balance and their indirect fiscal effects through their labor market impact. We calibrate the model to the US economy and find that legal immigrants increase native welfare, mainly due to their positive direct net contribution to the fiscal balance. On the other hand, illegal immigrants' positive welfare impact stems mainly from their positive effect on job creation, which helps improve the fiscal balance, but also increases income to natives and in turn consumption. A legalization program leads to a fiscal gain and increases native welfare and it is more beneficial to the host country's citizens than a purely restrictive immigration policy that reduces the illegal immigrant population.

Suggested Citation

  • Andri Chassamboulli & Xiangbo Liu, 2020. "Immigration, Legal Status and Fiscal Impact," University of Cyprus Working Papers in Economics 07-2020, University of Cyprus Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucy:cypeua:07-2020
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    File URL: http://papers.econ.ucy.ac.cy/RePEc/papers/07-20.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Chassamboulli, Andri & Peri, Giovanni, 2020. "The economic effect of immigration policies: analyzing and simulating the U.S. case," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 114(C).
    2. Andri Chassamboulli & Theodore Palivos, 2014. "A Search‐Equilibrium Approach To The Effects Of Immigration On Labor Market Outcomes," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 55, pages 111-129, February.
    3. Francisco L. Rivera-Batiz, 1999. "Undocumented workers in the labor market: An analysis of the earnings of legal and illegal Mexican immigrants in the United States," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 12(1), pages 91-116.
    4. Andri Chassambouli & Giovanni Peri, 2015. "The Labor Market Effects of Reducing the Number of Illegal Immigrants," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 18(4), pages 792-821, October.
    5. Ikhenaode, Bright Isaac, 2018. "Immigration, Skill Acquisition and Fiscal Redistribution in a Search-Equilibrium Model," MPRA Paper 89897, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Ni, Shawn, 1995. "An empirical analysis on the substitutability between private consumption and government purchases," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 593-605, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Immigration, Legal Status and Fiscal Impact
      by Christian Zimmermann in NEP-DGE blog on 2020-07-22 15:27:35

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Immigration; Search Frictions; Fiscal Impact; Welfare; Job creation; Immigration Policies;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • E20 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration

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