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The Economic Effect of Immigration Policies: Analyzing and Simulating the U.S. Case

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  • Andri Chassamboulli
  • Giovanni Peri

Abstract

In this paper we analyze the economic effects of different immigration policies in a model capturing economic and institutional features crucial to understand the migrant flows into the US. We explicitly differentiate among the most relevant channels of immigration to the US: family-based, employment-based and undocumented. Moreover we explicitly account for earning incentives to migrate and for the role of immigrant networks in generating job-related and family-related immigration opportunities. Hence, we can analyze the effect of policy changes through those channels. We find that all types of immigrants generate larger surplus to US firms than natives do. Restricting their entry has a depressing effect on job creation and, in turn, on native labor markets. We also show that substituting family-based entry with employment-based entry, and maintaining the total inflow of immigrants unchanged, produces a stimulus to job creation and native earnings.

Suggested Citation

  • Andri Chassamboulli & Giovanni Peri, 2019. "The Economic Effect of Immigration Policies: Analyzing and Simulating the U.S. Case," University of Cyprus Working Papers in Economics 06-2019, University of Cyprus Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucy:cypeua:06-2019
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Immigration; Networks; Job creation; Unemployment; Wages;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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