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Migration Policies: Recent Advances on Measurement, Determinants and Outcomes

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  • Francesc Ortega
  • Giovanni Peri

Abstract

This article introduces the special volume on migration policies, providing motivation and organizing and summarizing its contributions.

Suggested Citation

  • Francesc Ortega & Giovanni Peri, 2015. "Migration Policies: Recent Advances on Measurement, Determinants and Outcomes," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 61(3-4), pages 521-526.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:cesifo:v:61:y:2015:i:3-4:p:521-526.
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/cesifo/ifv012
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Christian Dustmann & Joseph-Simon Görlach, 2016. "The Economics of Temporary Migrations," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 54(1), pages 98-136, March.
    2. Farré Lidia & González Libertad & Ortega Francesc, 2011. "Immigration, Family Responsibilities and the Labor Supply of Skilled Native Women," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 11(1), pages 1-48, June.
    3. Ortega Francesc, 2010. "Immigration, Citizenship, and the Size of Government," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 10(1), pages 1-40, March.
    4. Michael Clemens, 2011. "Economics and Emigration: Trillion-Dollar Bills on the Sidewalk? - Working Paper 264," Working Papers 264, Center for Global Development.
    5. Michael A. Clemens, 2011. "Economics and Emigration: Trillion-Dollar Bills on the Sidewalk?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 25(3), pages 83-106, Summer.
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    Cited by:

    1. Chassamboulli, Andri & Peri, Giovanni, 2020. "The economic effect of immigration policies: analyzing and simulating the U.S. case," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 114(C).
    2. Makovec, Mattia & Purnamasari, Ririn & Sandi, Matteo & Savitri, Astrid, 2016. "Intended vs. unintended consequences of migration restriction policies: evidence from a natural experiment in Indonesia," ISER Working Paper Series 2016-13, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    3. Mattia Makovec & Ririn S Purnamasari & Matteo Sandi & Astrid R Savitri, 2018. "Intended versus unintended consequences of migration restriction policies: evidence from a natural experiment in Indonesia," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 18(4), pages 915-950.
    4. Thomas Steinwachs, 2019. "Geography Matters: Spatial Dimensions of Trade, Migration and Growth," ifo Beiträge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 81, April.

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