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Martin Uebele

Personal Details

First Name:Martin
Middle Name:
Last Name:Uebele
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pue7
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
Twitter: @martinuebele
Terminal Degree:2008 Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät; Humboldt-Universität Berlin (from RePEc Genealogy)

Research output

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Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Uebele, Martin, 2016. "Trendvariation oder säkulare Stagnation? Wachstum und Wirtschaftspolitik in historischer Perspektive," IW-Reports 1/2016, Institut der deutschen Wirtschaft Köln (IW) / Cologne Institute for Economic Research.
  2. Uebele, Martin & Geis, Wido, 2016. "Deutsche Einwanderung in den USA im 19. Jahrhundert: Lehren für die deutsche Einwanderungspolitik?," IW policy papers 7/2016, Institut der deutschen Wirtschaft Köln (IW) / Cologne Institute for Economic Research.
  3. Ni Yuping & Martin Uebele, 2015. "Size and structure of disaster relief when state capacity is limited: China’s 1823 flood," Working Papers 0083, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
  4. Albers, Thilo & Uebele, Martin, 2015. "The global impact of the great depression," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 64491, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  5. Martin Uebele & Daniel Gallardo-Albarrán, 2014. "Paving the way to modernity: Prussian roads and grain market integration in Westphalia, 1821-1855," Working Papers 0059, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
  6. Martin Uebele & Tim Grünebaum & Michael Kopsidis, 2013. "King's law and food storage in Saxony, c. 1790-1830," CQE Working Papers 2613, Center for Quantitative Economics (CQE), University of Muenster.
  7. Sharp, Paul & Uebele, Martin, 2013. "Rural Infrastructure and Agricultural Market Integration in the United States: A long run perspective," Discussion Papers of Business and Economics 10/2013, University of Southern Denmark, Department of Business and Economics.
  8. Grünebaum, Tim & Uebele, Martin, 2013. "Food security, harvest shocks, and the potato as secondary crop in Saxony, 1792-1811," GGDC Research Memorandum GD-139, Groningen Growth and Development Centre, University of Groningen.
  9. Ulrich Pfister & Jana Riedel & Martin Uebele, 2012. "Real Wages and the Origins of Modern Economic Growth in Germany, 16th to 19th Centuries," Working Papers 0017, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
  10. Max Meulemann & Martin Uebele & Bernd Wilfling, 2011. "The Restoration of the Gold Standard after the US Civil War: A Volatility Analysis," CQE Working Papers 2011, Center for Quantitative Economics (CQE), University of Muenster.
  11. Martin Uebele, 2010. "Demand Matters: German Wheat Market Integration 1806-1855 in a European Context," CQE Working Papers 1110, Center for Quantitative Economics (CQE), University of Muenster.
  12. Martin Uebele, 2010. "Identifying International Business Cycles in Disaggregate Data: Germany, France and Great Britain," CQE Working Papers 1610, Center for Quantitative Economics (CQE), University of Muenster.
  13. Martin Uebele, 2009. "International and National Wheat Market Integration in the 19th Century: A Comovement Analysis," CQE Working Papers 0409, Center for Quantitative Economics (CQE), University of Muenster.
  14. Ritschl, Albrecht & Sarferaz, Samad & Uebele, Martin, 2008. "The U.S. Business Cycle, 1867-1995: A Dynamic Factor Approach," CEPR Discussion Papers 7069, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  15. Albrecht Ritschl & Samad Sarferaz & Martin Uebele, 2008. "The U.S. Business Cycle, 1867-1995: Dynamic Factor Analysis vs. Reconstructed National Accounts," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2008-066, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
  16. Samad Sarferaz & Martin Uebele, 2007. "Tracking Down the Business Cycle: A Dynamic Factor Model For Germany 1820-1913," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2007-039, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
  17. Albrecht Ritschl & Martin Uebele, 2005. "Stock Markets and Business Cycle Comovement in Germany before World War I: Evidence from Spectral Analysis," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2005-056, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.

Articles

  1. Albrecht Ritschl & Samad Sarferaz & Martin Uebele, 2016. "The U.S. Business Cycle, 1867-2006: A Dynamic Factor Approach," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 98(1), pages 159-172, March.
  2. Martin Uebele & Daniel Gallardo-Albarrán, 2015. "Paving the way to modernity: Prussian roads and grain market integration in Westphalia, 1821-1855," Scandinavian Economic History Review, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 63(1), pages 69-92, March.
  3. Meulemann, Max & Uebele, Martin & Wilfling, Bernd, 2014. "The restoration of the gold standard after the US Civil War: A volatility analysis," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 12(C), pages 37-46.
  4. Martin Uebele, 2013. "What Drives Commodity Market Integration? Evidence from the 1800s," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 59(2), pages 412-442, June.
  5. Uebele Martin, 2011. "Die Identifikation internationaler Konjunkturzyklen in disaggregierten Daten: Deutschland, Frankreich und Großbritannien, 18621913," Jahrbuch für Wirtschaftsgeschichte / Economic History Yearbook, De Gruyter, vol. 52(1), pages 19-44, May.
  6. Uebele, Martin, 2011. "National and international market integration in the 19th century: Evidence from comovement," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 226-242, April.
  7. Uebele, Martin & Ritschl, Albrecht, 2009. "Stock markets and business cycle comovement in Germany before World War I: Evidence from spectral analysis," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 35-57, March.
  8. Sarferaz, Samad & Uebele, Martin, 2009. "Tracking down the business cycle: A dynamic factor model for Germany 1820-1913," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 46(3), pages 368-387, July.
  9. Labuske Kirsten & Rabus Sonja & Uebele Martin, 2007. "Conference Report Second Conference on German Cliometrics Tübingen, Germany, June 7-10, 2006," Jahrbuch für Wirtschaftsgeschichte / Economic History Yearbook, De Gruyter, vol. 48(1), pages 207-220, June.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Ulrich Pfister & Jana Riedel & Martin Uebele, 2012. "Real Wages and the Origins of Modern Economic Growth in Germany, 16th to 19th Centuries," Working Papers 0017, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).

    Mentioned in:

    1. Looking at the transition from Malthus to industrialization in Germany using real wages
      by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2012-05-10 19:31:00

Working papers

  1. Sharp, Paul & Uebele, Martin, 2013. "Rural Infrastructure and Agricultural Market Integration in the United States: A long run perspective," Discussion Papers of Business and Economics 10/2013, University of Southern Denmark, Department of Business and Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Clymer, Neil, 2015. "Aging U.S. Infrastructure," 商学討究 (Shogaku Tokyu), Otaru University of Commerce, vol. 66(1), pages 295-321.

  2. Grünebaum, Tim & Uebele, Martin, 2013. "Food security, harvest shocks, and the potato as secondary crop in Saxony, 1792-1811," GGDC Research Memorandum GD-139, Groningen Growth and Development Centre, University of Groningen.

    Cited by:

    1. Martin Uebele & Tim Grünebaum & Michael Kopsidis, 2013. "King's law and food storage in Saxony, c. 1790-1830," CQE Working Papers 2613, Center for Quantitative Economics (CQE), University of Muenster.

  3. Ulrich Pfister & Jana Riedel & Martin Uebele, 2012. "Real Wages and the Origins of Modern Economic Growth in Germany, 16th to 19th Centuries," Working Papers 0017, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).

    Cited by:

    1. Martin Uebele & Daniel Gallardo-Albarrán, 2014. "Paving the way to modernity: Prussian roads and grain market integration in Westphalia, 1821-1855," Working Papers 0059, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    2. Stijn Ronsse & Samuel Standaert, 2017. "Combining growth and level data: an estimation of the population of Belgian cities between 1880 and 1970," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 17/927, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
    3. Sheilagh Ogilvie & Markus Küpker, 2015. "Human Capital Investment in a Late-Developing Economy: Evidence from Württemberg, c. 1600 – c. 1900," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1528, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    4. Andrés Calderón-Fernández & Héctor García-Montero & Enrique Llopis-Agelán, 2017. "New research guidelines for living standards, consumer baskets, and prices in Madrid and Mexico," Working Papers 097, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
    5. Ogilvie, S. & Edwards, J. & Küpker, M., 2016. "Economically Relevant Human Capital or Multi-Purpose Consumption Good? Book Ownership in Pre-Modern Württemberg," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1655, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    6. Kopsidis, Michael & Bromley, Daniel W., 2014. "The French Revolution and German industrialization: The new institutional economics rewrites history," IAMO Discussion Papers 149, Leibniz Institute of Agricultural Development in Transition Economies (IAMO).
    7. Gerhard Wegner, 2015. "Capitalist transformation without political participation: German capitalism in the first half of the nineteenth century," Constitutional Political Economy, Springer, vol. 26(1), pages 61-86, March.
    8. Veenstra, Joost, 2015. "Output growth in German manufacturing, 1907–1936. A reinterpretation of time-series evidence," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 38-49.
    9. Michael Kopsidis & Ulrich Pfister, 2013. "Agricultural development during early industrialization in a low-wage economy: Saxony, c. 1790-1830," Working Papers 0039, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    10. Jaime Reis, 2016. "The Gross Agricultural Output of Portugal: A Quantitative, Unified Perspective, 1500-1850," Working Papers 0098, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).

  4. Martin Uebele, 2010. "Demand Matters: German Wheat Market Integration 1806-1855 in a European Context," CQE Working Papers 1110, Center for Quantitative Economics (CQE), University of Muenster.

    Cited by:

    1. Kopsidis, Michael & Wolf, Nikolaus, 2012. "Agricultural Productivity Across Prussia During the Industrial Revolution: A Thünen Perspective," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 72(03), pages 634-670, September.
    2. Martin Uebele & Daniel Gallardo-Albarrán, 2014. "Paving the way to modernity: Prussian roads and grain market integration in Westphalia, 1821-1855," Working Papers 0059, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    3. Uebele, Martin, 2011. "National and international market integration in the 19th century: Evidence from comovement," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 226-242, April.
    4. Keller, Wolfgang & Shiue, Carol Hua, 2013. "The Trade Impact of the Zollverein," CEPR Discussion Papers 9387, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

  5. Martin Uebele, 2010. "Identifying International Business Cycles in Disaggregate Data: Germany, France and Great Britain," CQE Working Papers 1610, Center for Quantitative Economics (CQE), University of Muenster.

    Cited by:

    1. Thomas C. Owen, 2013. "Measuring business cycles in the Russian Empire," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 66(3), pages 895-916, August.

  6. Martin Uebele, 2009. "International and National Wheat Market Integration in the 19th Century: A Comovement Analysis," CQE Working Papers 0409, Center for Quantitative Economics (CQE), University of Muenster.

    Cited by:

    1. Kopsidis, Michael & Wolf, Nikolaus, 2012. "Agricultural Productivity Across Prussia During the Industrial Revolution: A Thünen Perspective," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 72(03), pages 634-670, September.

  7. Ritschl, Albrecht & Sarferaz, Samad & Uebele, Martin, 2008. "The U.S. Business Cycle, 1867-1995: A Dynamic Factor Approach," CEPR Discussion Papers 7069, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

    Cited by:

    1. Michael Artis & George Chouliarakis & P. K. G. Harischandra, 2011. "Business Cycle Synchronization Since 1880," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 79(2), pages 173-207, March.
    2. Albrecht Ritschl & Samad Sarferaz, 2010. "Crisis? What Crisis? Currency vs. Banking in the Financial Crisis of 1931," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2010-014, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
    3. Pooyan Amir‐Ahmadi & Christian Matthes & Mu‐Chun Wang, 2016. "Drifts and volatilities under measurement error: Assessing monetary policy shocks over the last century," Quantitative Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 7(2), pages 591-611, July.

  8. Albrecht Ritschl & Samad Sarferaz & Martin Uebele, 2008. "The U.S. Business Cycle, 1867-1995: Dynamic Factor Analysis vs. Reconstructed National Accounts," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2008-066, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Stefan Oliver Houpt & Juan Carlos Rojo Cagigal, 2014. "Relative deprivation and labour conflict during Spain’s industrialization: the Bilbao estuary, 1914–1936," Cliometrica, Journal of Historical Economics and Econometric History, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC), vol. 8(3), pages 335-369, September.
    2. Selgin, George & Lastrapes, William D. & White, Lawrence H., 2012. "Has the Fed been a failure?," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 569-596.
    3. Matthias Morys & Martin Ivanov, 2013. "The emergence of a European region: Business cycles in South-East Europe from political independence to World War II," Centre for Historical Economics and Related Research at York (CHERRY) Discussion Papers 13/01, CHERRY, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    4. Matthias Morys & Martin Ivanov, 2009. "Common factors in South-East Europe’s business cycles 1899 - 1989," SEEMHN papers 1, National Bank of Serbia.

  9. Samad Sarferaz & Martin Uebele, 2007. "Tracking Down the Business Cycle: A Dynamic Factor Model For Germany 1820-1913," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2007-039, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Andersson, Fredrik N. G. & Lennard, Jason, 2016. "Irish GDP between the Famine and the First World War: Estimates Based on a Dynamic Factor Model," Working Papers 2016:13, Lund University, Department of Economics, revised 16 Jan 2018.
    2. Ulrich Pfister & Jana Riedel & Martin Uebele, 2012. "Real Wages and the Origins of Modern Economic Growth in Germany, 16th to 19th Centuries," Working Papers 0017, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    3. Uebele, Martin & Ritschl, Albrecht, 2009. "Stock markets and business cycle comovement in Germany before World War I: Evidence from spectral analysis," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 35-57, March.
    4. Albers, Thilo & Uebele, Martin, 2015. "The global impact of the great depression," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 64491, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    5. Ritschl, Albrecht & Sarferaz, Samad & Uebele, Martin, 2008. "The U.S. Business Cycle, 1867-1995: A Dynamic Factor Approach," CEPR Discussion Papers 7069, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Henning, Martin & Enflo, Kerstin & Andersson, Fredrik N.G., 2011. "Trends and cycles in regional economic growth," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 48(4), pages 538-555.
    7. George Chouliarakis & Tadeusz Gwiazdowski & Sophia Lazaretou, 2016. "The Effect of Fiscal Policy on Output in Times of Crisis and Prosperity: Historical Evidence From Greece ," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 230, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
    8. Veenstra, Joost, 2015. "Output growth in German manufacturing, 1907–1936. A reinterpretation of time-series evidence," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 38-49.

  10. Albrecht Ritschl & Martin Uebele, 2005. "Stock Markets and Business Cycle Comovement in Germany before World War I: Evidence from Spectral Analysis," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2005-056, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. William A. Allen & Richhild Moessner, 2011. "The international propagation of the financial crisis of 2008 and a comparison with 1931," BIS Working Papers 348, Bank for International Settlements.
    2. Tang, Ling & Yu, Lean & He, Kaijian, 2014. "A novel data-characteristic-driven modeling methodology for nuclear energy consumption forecasting," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 128(C), pages 1-14.
    3. Rania Jammazi & Chaker Aloui, 2014. "Cyclical components and dual long memory in the foreign exchange rate dynamics: the Tunisian case," Working Papers 2014-198, Department of Research, Ipag Business School.
    4. Łukasz Lenart & Mateusz Pipień, 2017. "Non-Parametric Test for the Existence of the Common Deterministic Cycle: The Case of the Selected European Countries," Central European Journal of Economic Modelling and Econometrics, CEJEME, vol. 9(3), pages 201-241, September.
    5. Sarferaz, Samad & Uebele, Martin, 2009. "Tracking down the business cycle: A dynamic factor model for Germany 1820-1913," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 46(3), pages 368-387, July.
    6. Lukasz Lenart, 2015. "Discrete Spectral Analysis. The Case of Industrial Production in Selected European Countries," Dynamic Econometric Models, Uniwersytet Mikolaja Kopernika, vol. 15, pages 27-47.
    7. Reijnders, Jan P.G., 2009. "Trend movements and inverted Kondratieff waves in the Dutch economy, 1800-1913," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 90-113, June.
    8. Thomas C. Owen, 2013. "Measuring business cycles in the Russian Empire," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 66(3), pages 895-916, August.

Articles

  1. Albrecht Ritschl & Samad Sarferaz & Martin Uebele, 2016. "The U.S. Business Cycle, 1867-2006: A Dynamic Factor Approach," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 98(1), pages 159-172, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Pooyan Amir‐Ahmadi & Christian Matthes & Mu‐Chun Wang, 2016. "Drifts and volatilities under measurement error: Assessing monetary policy shocks over the last century," Quantitative Economics, Econometric Society, vol. 7(2), pages 591-611, July.

  2. Martin Uebele, 2013. "What Drives Commodity Market Integration? Evidence from the 1800s," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 59(2), pages 412-442, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Irena Mikolajun & Jean-Marie Viaene, 2015. "Trade, Factor Mobility and the Extent of Economic Integration: Theory and Evidence," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 15-096/VI, Tinbergen Institute.
    2. Irena Mikolajun & Jean-Marie Viaene, 2015. "Trade, Factor Mobility and the Extent of Economic Integration: Theory and Evidence," CESifo Working Paper Series 5481, CESifo Group Munich.

  3. Uebele, Martin, 2011. "National and international market integration in the 19th century: Evidence from comovement," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 226-242, April.

    Cited by:

    1. Markus Lampe & Paul Sharp, 2017. "ÔRationalÕ Farmers and the Emergence of Modern Accounting in Danish Dairying," Working Papers 0115, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    2. Martin Uebele & Daniel Gallardo-Albarrán, 2014. "Paving the way to modernity: Prussian roads and grain market integration in Westphalia, 1821-1855," Working Papers 0059, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    3. Sharp, Paul & Uebele, Martin, 2013. "Rural Infrastructure and Agricultural Market Integration in the United States: A long run perspective," Discussion Papers of Business and Economics 10/2013, University of Southern Denmark, Department of Business and Economics.
    4. Vincent Bignon & Cecilia Garcia-Peñalosa, 2016. "Protectionism and the Education-Fertility Trade-off in Late 19th Century France," AMSE Working Papers 1604, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, Marseille, France, revised Jan 2016.
    5. Chilosi, David & Federico, Giovanni, 2015. "Early globalizations: The integration of Asia in the world economy, 1800–1938," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 1-18.
    6. Åberg, M. & Fälting, L. & Forssell, A., 2016. "Is Swedish district heating operating on an integrated market? – Differences in pricing, price convergence, and marketing strategy between public and private district heating companies," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 222-232.
    7. David Chilosi & Tommy E. Murphy & Roman Studer, 2011. "Europe’s Many Integrations: Geography and Grain Markets, 1620-1913," Working Papers 412, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
    8. Sharp, Paul & Weisdorf, Jacob, 2013. "Globalization revisited: Market integration and the wheat trade between North America and Britain from the eighteenth century," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 88-98.
    9. Markus Lampe & Paul Sharp, 2014. "Greasing the wheels of rural transformation? Margarine and the competition for the British butter market," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 67(3), pages 769-792, August.
    10. Veenstra, Joost, 2015. "Output growth in German manufacturing, 1907–1936. A reinterpretation of time-series evidence," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 38-49.
    11. Li, Zhuo & Panza, Laura & Song, Yong, 2017. "The evolution of Ottoman-European market linkages, 1469-1914: evidence from dynamic factor models," MPRA Paper 80953, University Library of Munich, Germany.

  4. Uebele, Martin & Ritschl, Albrecht, 2009. "Stock markets and business cycle comovement in Germany before World War I: Evidence from spectral analysis," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 35-57, March.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  5. Sarferaz, Samad & Uebele, Martin, 2009. "Tracking down the business cycle: A dynamic factor model for Germany 1820-1913," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 46(3), pages 368-387, July.
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 18 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (17) 2005-12-01 2006-01-24 2007-07-13 2008-12-07 2009-02-28 2009-12-11 2010-03-13 2010-12-04 2011-02-26 2012-05-02 2013-01-12 2013-07-15 2013-07-15 2015-01-09 2015-07-25 2015-12-01 2017-04-30. Author is listed
  2. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (8) 2005-12-01 2006-01-24 2007-07-13 2008-12-07 2009-02-28 2010-12-04 2015-12-01 2017-04-30. Author is listed
  3. NEP-AGR: Agricultural Economics (3) 2010-03-13 2013-07-15 2013-07-15
  4. NEP-BEC: Business Economics (3) 2008-12-07 2009-02-28 2010-12-04
  5. NEP-GER: German Papers (2) 2016-07-02 2017-04-30
  6. NEP-CNA: China (1) 2015-07-25
  7. NEP-ETS: Econometric Time Series (1) 2008-12-07
  8. NEP-IFN: International Finance (1) 2011-02-26
  9. NEP-MON: Monetary Economics (1) 2011-02-26
  10. NEP-OPM: Open Economy Macroeconomics (1) 2010-12-04
  11. NEP-TRE: Transport Economics (1) 2015-01-09

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