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Europe's many integrations: Geography and grain markets, 1620–1913

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  • Chilosi, David
  • Murphy, Tommy E.
  • Studer, Roman
  • Tunçer, A. Coşkun

Abstract

This article documents and examines the integration of markets across the early modern/late modern divide, exploiting the largest dataset compiled to date on grain prices, spanning one hundred European cities evenly spread across land-locked and low-land areas. Using those series, it studies various measures of integration across distances and regions, and relies on principal component analysis to identify market structures. The analysis finds that European market integration was a gradual and step-wise rather than sudden process, and that early modern market structures were shaped by geography more directly than by political borders.

Suggested Citation

  • Chilosi, David & Murphy, Tommy E. & Studer, Roman & Tunçer, A. Coşkun, 2013. "Europe's many integrations: Geography and grain markets, 1620–1913," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 46-68.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:exehis:v:50:y:2013:i:1:p:46-68
    DOI: 10.1016/j.eeh.2012.09.002
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:exehis:v:64:y:2017:i:c:p:1-20 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Broadberry, Stephen & Gardner, Leigh, 2016. "Economic Development In Africa And Europe: Reciprocal Comparisons," Revista de Historia Económica, Cambridge University Press, vol. 34(01), pages 11-37, March.
    3. Chilosi, David, 2014. "Risky Institutions: Political Regimes and the Cost of Public Borrowing in Early Modern Italy," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 74(03), pages 887-915, September.
    4. Mickaël Benaim & Faustine Perrin, 2017. "Regional Patterns of Economic Development. A Typology of French Departments during the Industrialization," Working Papers 04-17, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC).
    5. Ke Yao & Xiao-Ping Zheng, 2016. "A Comparison of Market Integration in Nineteenth-Century China and Japan," Australian Economic History Review, Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 56(3), pages 246-271, November.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    International and domestic trade; Transport costs; Geography; Economic integration; Grain markets; Factor analysis; Europe; Pre-1913;

    JEL classification:

    • N13 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - Europe: Pre-1913
    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration
    • C38 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Classification Methdos; Cluster Analysis; Principal Components; Factor Analysis
    • N73 - Economic History - - Economic History: Transport, International and Domestic Trade, Energy, and Other Services - - - Europe: Pre-1913
    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade
    • Q17 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agriculture in International Trade

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