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Tommy E. Murphy

Personal Details

First Name:Tommy
Middle Name:E.
Last Name:Murphy
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pmu225
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
https://www.udesa.edu.ar/econ/tmurphy
Universidad de San Andrés Vito Dumas 284 B1644BID Victoria Provincia de Buenos Aires Argentina
+54 11 4725.7041

Affiliation

Departamento de Economía
Universidad de San Andrés

Buenos Aires, Argentina
http://www.udesa.edu.ar/departamento-de-economia

: +5411-4725-7000
+5411-4725-7010
Vito Dumas 284, Victoria, Buenos Aires, B1644BID
RePEc:edi:desanar (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Tomás E. Murphy & Martín Rossi, 2017. "Following the Poppy Trail: Causes and Consequences of Mexican Drug Cartels," Working Papers 130, Universidad de San Andres, Departamento de Economia, revised Dec 2017.
  2. Tommy E. Murphy & Mart√≠n A. Rossi, 2015. "Land Reform and Violence: Evidence from Mexico," Working Papers 072, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
  3. Sandra González-Bailón & Tommy E. Murphy, 2011. "Social Interactions and Long-Term Fertility Dynamics.A Simulation Experiment in the Context of the French Fertility Decline," Working Papers 419, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
  4. Robert C. Allen & Tommy E. Murphy & Eric B. Schneider, 2011. "The Colonial Origins of the Divergence in the Americas: A Labour Market Approach," Working Papers 402, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
  5. David Chilosi & Tommy E. Murphy & Roman Studer, 2011. "Europe’s Many Integrations: Geography and Grain Markets, 1620-1913," Working Papers 412, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
  6. Robert Allen & Robert C. Allen & Tommy E. Murphy and Eric B. Schneider, 2011. "The Colonial Origins of Divergence in the Americas:Â A Labour Market Approach," Economics Series Working Papers 559, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  7. Tommy E. Murphy, 2010. "Old Habits Die Hard (Sometimes) Can département heterogeneity tell us something about the French fertility decline??," Working Papers 364, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
  8. Tommy E. Murphy, 2010. "Persistence of Malthus or Persistence in Malthus? Mortality, Income, and Marriage in the French Fertility Decline of the Long Nineteenth Century?," Working Papers 363, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
  9. Sandra Gonzalez-Bailon & Tommy Murphy, 2008. "When Smaller Families Look Contagious: A Spatial Look At The French Fertility Decline Using An Agent-Based Simulation Model," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _071, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.

Articles

  1. Alfani, Guido & Murphy, Tommy E., 2017. "Plague and Lethal Epidemics in the Pre-Industrial World," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 77(01), pages 314-343, March.
  2. Murphy, Tommy E. & Rossi, Martín A., 2016. "Land reform and violence: Evidence from Mexico," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 131(PA), pages 106-113.
  3. Tommy Murphy, 2015. "Old habits die hard (sometimes)," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 20(2), pages 177-222, June.
  4. Allen, Robert C. & Murphy, Tommy E. & Schneider, Eric B., 2015. "Una De Cal Y Otra De Arena: Building Comparable Real Wages In A Global Perspective," Revista de Historia Económica, Cambridge University Press, vol. 33(01), pages 61-75, March.
  5. Sandra González-Bailón & Tommy E. Murphy, 2013. "The effects of social interactions on fertility decline in nineteenth-century France: An agent-based simulation experiment," Population Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 67(2), pages 135-155, July.
  6. Chilosi, David & Murphy, Tommy E. & Studer, Roman & Tunçer, A. Coşkun, 2013. "Europe's many integrations: Geography and grain markets, 1620–1913," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 46-68.
  7. Allen, Robert C. & Murphy, Tommy E. & Schneider, Eric B., 2012. "The Colonial Origins of the Divergence in the Americas: A Labor Market Approach," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 72(04), pages 863-894, December.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Robert C. Allen & Tommy E. Murphy & Eric B. Schneider, 2011. "The Colonial Origins of the Divergence in the Americas: A Labour Market Approach," Working Papers 402, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.

    Cited by:

    1. Joshua L. Rosenbloom & Thomas J. Weiss, 2011. "Economic Growth in the Mid Atlantic Region: Conjectural Estimates for 1720 to 1800," NBER Working Papers 17215, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Nikolova, Elena & Nikolova, Milena, 2017. "Suffrage, labour markets and coalitions in colonial Virginia," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 108-122.
    3. Peter H. Lindert & Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2014. "American Colonial Incomes, 1650-1774," NBER Working Papers 19861, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Paul Caruana-Galizia, 2015. "Strategic colonies and economic development: real wages in Cyprus, Gibraltar, and Malta, 1836–1913," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 68(4), pages 1250-1276, November.
    5. Laura Panza & Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2017. "Australian Exceptionalism? Inequality and Living Standards 1821-1871," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 2027, The University of Melbourne.
    6. Andrés Calderón-Fernández & Héctor García-Montero & Enrique Llopis-Agelán, 2017. "New research guidelines for living standards, consumer baskets, and prices in Madrid and Mexico," Working Papers 097, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
    7. Myung Soo Cha, 2015. "Unskilled wage gaps within the Japanese Empire," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 68(1), pages 23-47, February.
    8. Geloso, Vincent & Kufenko, Vadim & Villeneuve, Remy, 2016. "Living standards in Lower Canada, 1831," Violette Reihe: Schriftenreihe des Promotionsschwerpunkts "Globalisierung und Beschäftigung" 50/2016, University of Hohenheim, Carl von Ossietzky University Oldenburg, Evangelisches Studienwerk.
    9. Leonardo Ridolfi, 2017. "L'histoire immobile? Six centuries of real wages in France from Louis IX to Napoleon III: 1250-1860," LEM Papers Series 2017/14, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
    10. Jane Humphries & Jacob Weisdorf, 2017. "Unreal Wages? Real Income And Economic Growth In England, 1260-1850," Working Papers 0121, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    11. Trevor Burnard & Laura Panza & Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2017. "The Social Implications of Sugar: Living Costs, Real Incomes and Inequality in Jamaica c1774," NBER Working Papers 23897, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Robert C. Allen, 2013. "The High Wage Economy and the Industrial Revolution: A Restatement," Published Papers dok25, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration.
    13. Peter H. Lindert, 2016. "Purchasing Power Disparity before 1914," NBER Working Papers 22896, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Remi Jedwab & Dietrich Vollrath, 2015. "Urbanization without Growth in Historical Perspective," Working Papers 2015-7, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
    15. Ho, Chi Pui, 2016. "GeoPopulation-Institution Hypothesis: Reconciling American Development Process and Reversal of Fortune within a Unified Growth Framework," MPRA Paper 73863, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. Jaime Reis, 2016. "The Gross Agricultural Output of Portugal: A Quantitative, Unified Perspective, 1500-1850," Working Papers 0098, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    17. Costa, Leonor Freire & Palma, Nuno & Reis, Jaime, 2013. "The great escape? The contribution of the empire to Portugal’s economic growth, 1500-1800," IFCS - Working Papers in Economic History.WH wp13-07, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Instituto Figuerola.
    18. Ernesto López Losa & Santiago Piquero Zarauz, 2016. "Spanish real wages in the Northern-Western European mirror, 1500-1800. On the timings and magnitude of the Little Divergence in Europe," Documentos de Trabajo (DT-AEHE) 1607, Asociacion Espa–ola de Historia Economica.
    19. Javier L. Arnaut, 2017. "Was Colonialism Fiscally Sustainable? An Empirical Examination of the Colonial Finances of Spanish America," Documentos de Trabajo (DT-AEHE) 1703, Asociacion Espa–ola de Historia Economica.
    20. Julio Martínez-Galarraga & Marc Prat, 2014. "Wages and prices in early Catalan industrialisation," UB Economics Working Papers 2014/305, Universitat de Barcelona, Facultat d'Economia i Empresa, UB Economics.
    21. Arsenault Morin, Alex & Geloso, Vincent & Kufenko, Vadim, 2017. "The heights of French-Canadian convicts, 1780s–1820s," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 26(C), pages 126-136.

  2. David Chilosi & Tommy E. Murphy & Roman Studer, 2011. "Europe’s Many Integrations: Geography and Grain Markets, 1620-1913," Working Papers 412, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.

    Cited by:

    1. Johnson, Noel D. & Koyama, Mark, 2017. "States and economic growth: Capacity and constraints," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 1-20.
    2. Broadberry, Stephen & Gardner, Leigh, 2016. "Economic Development In Africa And Europe: Reciprocal Comparisons," Revista de Historia Económica, Cambridge University Press, vol. 34(01), pages 11-37, March.
    3. Chilosi, David, 2014. "Risky institutions: political regimes and the cost of public borrowing in early modern Italy," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 59571, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    4. Mickaël Benaim & Faustine Perrin, 2017. "Regional Patterns of Economic Development. A Typology of French Departments during the Industrialization," Working Papers 04-17, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC).
    5. Ke Yao & Xiao-Ping Zheng, 2016. "A Comparison of Market Integration in Nineteenth-Century China and Japan," Australian Economic History Review, Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 56(3), pages 246-271, November.

  3. Robert Allen & Robert C. Allen & Tommy E. Murphy and Eric B. Schneider, 2011. "The Colonial Origins of Divergence in the Americas:Â A Labour Market Approach," Economics Series Working Papers 559, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Allen, Robert C., 2014. "American Exceptionalism as a Problem in Global History," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 74(02), pages 309-350, June.
    2. Peter H. Lindert & Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2012. "American Incomes 1774-1860," NBER Working Papers 18396, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Robert C. Allen, 2013. "The High Wage Economy and the Industrial Revolution: A Restatement," Published Papers dok25, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration.

  4. Tommy E. Murphy, 2010. "Old Habits Die Hard (Sometimes) Can département heterogeneity tell us something about the French fertility decline??," Working Papers 364, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.

    Cited by:

    1. Duarte Nuno Leite & Óscar Afonso & Sandra Tavares Silva, 2015. "The Two Revolutions, Landed Elites and Education during the Industrial Revolution," FEP Working Papers 562, Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto.
    2. Oded Galor, 2010. "The Demographic Transition: Causes and Consequences," Working Papers 2010-12, Brown University, Department of Economics.
    3. Nico Voigtländer & Joachim Voth, 2008. "How the West "invented" fertility restriction," Economics Working Papers 1264, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Dec 2012.
    4. Mara P. Squicciarini & Nico Voigtländer, 2014. "Human Capital and Industrialization: Evidence from the Age of Enlightenment," NBER Working Papers 20219, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Paul Cahu & Falilou Fall & Roland Pongou, 2014. "Beauty, Polygyny and Fertility: Theory and Evidence," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-01130403, HAL.
    6. Jun, Bogang, 2013. "The Trade-off between Fertility and Education: Evidence from the Korean Development Path," MPRA Paper 43971, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Casey, Gregory & Galor, Oded, 2014. "Population Dynamics and Long-Run Economic Growth," MPRA Paper 62598, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Casper Worm Hansen & Peter Sandholt Jensen & Lars Lønstrup, 2014. "The Fertility Transition in the US: Schooling or Income?," Economics Working Papers 2014-02, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
    9. Claude Diebolt & Audrey-Rose Menard & Faustine Perrin, 2016. "Behind the Fertility-Education Nexus: What Triggered the French Development Process?," Working Papers 03-16, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC).
    10. Timothy W. Guinnane, 2011. "The Historical Fertility Transition: A Guide for Economists," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 49(3), pages 589-614, September.
    11. Sandra Gonzalez-Bailon & Tommy Murphy, 2008. "When Smaller Families Look Contagious: A Spatial Look At The French Fertility Decline Using An Agent-Based Simulation Model," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _071, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
    12. Francesco Cinnirella & Jochen Streb, 2017. "The role of human capital and innovation in economic development: evidence from post-Malthusian Prussia," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 22(2), pages 193-227, June.
    13. Guillaume Daudin & Raphaël Franck & Hillel Rapoport, 2016. "The Cultural Diffusion of the Fertility Transition: Evidence from Internal Migration in 19th Century France," Working Papers hal-01308354, HAL.
    14. Shin, Inyong, 2013. "The Effect of Compressed Demographic Transition and Demographic Gift on Economic Growth," MPRA Paper 45003, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Philipp Ager & Casper Worm Hansen & Peter Sandholt Jensen, 2014. "Fertility and early-life mortality: Evidence from smallpox vaccination in Sweden," Working Papers 0058, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    16. Carolyn Chisadza & Manoel Bittencourt, 2015. "Education and Fertility: Panel Evidence from sub-Saharan Africa," Working Papers 201526, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    17. David Cuberes & Alberto Basso, 2012. "Human Capital, Culture and the Onset of the Demographic Transition," Working Papers 2012024, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
    18. Sandra González-Bailón & Tommy E. Murphy, 2011. "Social Interactions and Long-Term Fertility Dynamics.A Simulation Experiment in the Context of the French Fertility Decline," Working Papers 419, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
    19. Alberto Basso & David Cuberes Vilalta, 2011. "Institutions, culture and the onset of the demographic transition," Working Papers. Serie AD 2011-13, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
    20. Joshua R. Goldstein & Sebastian Klüsener, 2014. "Spatial Analysis of the Causes of Fertility Decline in Prussia," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 40(3), pages 497-525, September.

  5. Tommy E. Murphy, 2010. "Persistence of Malthus or Persistence in Malthus? Mortality, Income, and Marriage in the French Fertility Decline of the Long Nineteenth Century?," Working Papers 363, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.

    Cited by:

    1. Alan Fernihough, 2013. "Malthusian Dynamics in a Diverging Europe: Northern Italy, 1650–1881," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 50(1), pages 311-332, February.
    2. Timothy W. Guinnane & Susana Martinez Rodriguez, 2012. "For Every Law, a Loophole: Flexibility in the Menu of Spanish Business Forms, 1886-1936," Working Papers 1012, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    3. Leonardo Ridolfi, 2017. "L'histoire immobile? Six centuries of real wages in France from Louis IX to Napoleon III: 1250-1860," LEM Papers Series 2017/14, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
    4. Timothy W. Guinnane, 2011. "The Historical Fertility Transition: A Guide for Economists," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 49(3), pages 589-614, September.
    5. Miikka Voutilainen, 2015. "Malthusian checks in pre-industrial Sweden and Finland: a comparative analysis of the demographic regimes," Scandinavian Economic History Review, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 63(3), pages 235-259, November.

  6. Sandra Gonzalez-Bailon & Tommy Murphy, 2008. "When Smaller Families Look Contagious: A Spatial Look At The French Fertility Decline Using An Agent-Based Simulation Model," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _071, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.

    Cited by:

    1. Paul David & S. Ryan Johansson and Andrea Pozzi, 2010. "The Demography of an Early Mortality Transition: Life Expectancy, Survival and Mortality Rates for Britain's Royals, 1500-1799," Economics Series Working Papers Number 83, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    2. Guillaume Daudin & Raphaël Franck & Hillel Rapoport, 2016. "The Cultural Diffusion of the Fertility Transition: Evidence from Internal Migration in 19th Century France," Working Papers hal-01308354, HAL.

Articles

  1. Alfani, Guido & Murphy, Tommy E., 2017. "Plague and Lethal Epidemics in the Pre-Industrial World," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 77(01), pages 314-343, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Guido Alfani & Marco Percoco, 2016. "Plague and long-term development: the lasting effects of the 1629-30 epidemic on the Italian cities," Working Papers 0106, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    2. Leonardo Ridolfi, 2017. "L'histoire immobile? Six centuries of real wages in France from Louis IX to Napoleon III: 1250-1860," LEM Papers Series 2017/14, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.
    3. Cummins, Neil, 2017. "Lifespans of the European elite, 800–1800," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 83576, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

  2. Tommy Murphy, 2015. "Old habits die hard (sometimes)," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 20(2), pages 177-222, June.

    Cited by:

    1. Nico Voigtländer & Joachim Voth, 2008. "How the West "invented" fertility restriction," Economics Working Papers 1264, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Dec 2012.
    2. Carol H. Shiue, 2013. "Human Capital and Fertility in Chinese Clans Before Modern Growth," NBER Working Papers 19661, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Claude Diebolt & Tapas Mishra & Faustine Perrin, 2015. "Did Gender-Bias Matter in the Quantity- Quality Trade-off in the 19th Century France ?," Working Papers of BETA 2015-28, Bureau d'Economie Théorique et Appliquée, UDS, Strasbourg.
    4. Alberto Basso, 2015. "Does Democracy Foster the Fertility Transition?," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 68(4), pages 459-474, November.
    5. David de la Croix & Faustine Perrin, 2016. "French Fertility and Education Transition: Rational Choice vs. Cultural Diffusion," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2016007, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    6. Diebolt, Claude & Mishra, Tapas & Perrin, Faustine, 2015. "Did Gender-Bias Matter in the Quantity-Quality Trade-off in 19th Century France?," Lund Papers in Economic History 141, Lund University, Department of Economic History.
    7. Vincent Bignon & Cecilia García-Peñalosa, 2016. "Protectionism and the Education-Fertility Trade-off in Late 19th Century France," Working Papers halshs-01264614, HAL.
    8. Alan Fernihough, 2017. "Human capital and the quantity–quality trade-off during the demographic transition," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 22(1), pages 35-65, March.
    9. Timothy W. Guinnane & Susana Martinez Rodriguez, 2012. "For Every Law, a Loophole: Flexibility in the Menu of Spanish Business Forms, 1886-1936," Working Papers 1012, Economic Growth Center, Yale University.
    10. Fernihough, Alan, 2017. "Less is More? The child quantity-quality trade-off in early 20th century England and Wales," QUCEH Working Paper Series 2017-07, Queen's University Belfast, Queen's University Centre for Economic History.
    11. Ho, Chi Pui, 2016. "Rise of Women in Unified Growth Theory: French Development Process and Policy Implications," MPRA Paper 73864, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. You, Jing & Yi, Xuejie & Chen, Meng, 2016. "Love, Life, and “Leftover Ladies” in Urban China," MPRA Paper 70494, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Sandra Gonzalez-Bailon & Tommy Murphy, 2008. "When Smaller Families Look Contagious: A Spatial Look at the French Fertility Decline Using an Agent-Based Simulation Model," Economics Series Working Papers 71, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.

  3. Allen, Robert C. & Murphy, Tommy E. & Schneider, Eric B., 2015. "Una De Cal Y Otra De Arena: Building Comparable Real Wages In A Global Perspective," Revista de Historia Económica, Cambridge University Press, vol. 33(01), pages 61-75, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Andrés Calderón-Fernández & Héctor García-Montero & Enrique Llopis-Agelán, 2017. "New research guidelines for living standards, consumer baskets, and prices in Madrid and Mexico," Working Papers 097, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
    2. John Scott & Enrique de la Rosa & Rodrigo Aranda, 2017. "Inequality and fiscal redistribution in Mexico: 1992–2015," WIDER Working Paper Series 194, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    3. Ernesto López Losa & Santiago Piquero Zarauz, 2016. "Spanish real wages in the Northern-Western European mirror, 1500-1800. On the timings and magnitude of the Little Divergence in Europe," Documentos de Trabajo (DT-AEHE) 1607, Asociacion Espa–ola de Historia Economica.
    4. Enriqueta Camps & Stanley L. Engerman, 2016. "The Impact of Race and Inequality on Human Capital Formation in Latin America During the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries," Working Papers 885, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.

  4. Sandra González-Bailón & Tommy E. Murphy, 2013. "The effects of social interactions on fertility decline in nineteenth-century France: An agent-based simulation experiment," Population Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 67(2), pages 135-155, July.

    Cited by:

    1. David de la Croix & Faustine Perrin, 2016. "French Fertility and Education Transition: Rational Choice vs. Cultural Diffusion," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2016007, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    2. Tommy Murphy, 2015. "Old habits die hard (sometimes)," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 20(2), pages 177-222, June.
    3. Sebastian Klüsener, 2015. "Spatial variation in non-marital fertility across Europe: recent trends, past path dependencies, and potential future pathways," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2015-001, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    4. Arianna Caporali & Sebastian Klüsener & Gerda Neyer & Sandra Krapf & Olga Grigorieva & Dora Kostova, 2016. "The Contextual Database of the Generations and Gender Programme: Concept, content, and research examples," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 35(9), pages 229-252, August.
    5. Ulla Lehmijoki & Tapio Palokangas, 2016. "Land reforms and population growth," Portuguese Economic Journal, Springer;Instituto Superior de Economia e Gestao, vol. 15(1), pages 1-15, April.
    6. Vegard Skirbekk & Marcin Stonawski & Guido Alfani, 2014. "Consequences of a universal European demographic transition on regional and global population distributions," Working Papers 068, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.

  5. Chilosi, David & Murphy, Tommy E. & Studer, Roman & Tunçer, A. Coşkun, 2013. "Europe's many integrations: Geography and grain markets, 1620–1913," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 46-68.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  6. Allen, Robert C. & Murphy, Tommy E. & Schneider, Eric B., 2012. "The Colonial Origins of the Divergence in the Americas: A Labor Market Approach," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 72(04), pages 863-894, December.
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 8 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (5) 2010-06-18 2011-07-21 2011-07-27 2011-09-16 2018-01-08. Author is listed
  2. NEP-AGR: Agricultural Economics (2) 2011-09-16 2015-04-11
  3. NEP-CMP: Computational Economics (2) 2009-04-13 2011-10-22
  4. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (2) 2011-07-21 2011-07-27
  5. NEP-LAM: Central & South America (2) 2011-07-21 2011-07-27
  6. NEP-SEA: South East Asia (2) 2011-07-21 2011-07-27
  7. NEP-CBE: Cognitive & Behavioural Economics (1) 2010-06-18
  8. NEP-CIS: Confederation of Independent States (1) 2011-10-22
  9. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (1) 2011-10-22
  10. NEP-EVO: Evolutionary Economics (1) 2011-10-22
  11. NEP-EXP: Experimental Economics (1) 2011-10-22
  12. NEP-GEO: Economic Geography (1) 2011-09-16
  13. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (1) 2010-06-18
  14. NEP-LAW: Law & Economics (1) 2018-01-08
  15. NEP-LTV: Unemployment, Inequality & Poverty (1) 2011-07-27
  16. NEP-MIG: Economics of Human Migration (1) 2018-01-08
  17. NEP-SOC: Social Norms & Social Capital (1) 2011-10-22
  18. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2009-04-13

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