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Roman Studer

Personal Details

First Name:Roman
Middle Name:
Last Name:Studer
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pst373

Affiliation

UBS International Center of Economics in Society
Institut für Volkswirtschaftslehre
Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakutät
Universität Zürich

Zürich, Switzerland
http://www.ubscenter.uzh.ch/

: +41-1-634 21 37
+41-1-634 49 82
+41-1-634 21 37
RePEc:edi:icezhch (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles Books

Working papers

  1. Studer, Roman, 2009. "Does trade explain Europe’s rise? Geography, market size and economic development," Economic History Working Papers 27877, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
  2. Roman Studer, 2007. "India and the Great Divergence: Assessing the Efficiency of Grain Markets in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century India," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _068, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.

Articles

  1. Chilosi, David & Murphy, Tommy E. & Studer, Roman & Tunçer, A. Coşkun, 2013. "Europe's many integrations: Geography and grain markets, 1620–1913," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 46-68.
  2. Studer, Roman, 2009. "The New Comparative Economic History: Essays in Honor of Jeffrey G. Williamson. Edited by Timothy J. Hatton, Kevin H. O'Rourke, and Alan M. Taylor. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2007. Pp. x, 417. $40, clo," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 69(03), pages 898-899, September.
  3. Studer, Roman, 2008. "India and the Great Divergence: Assessing the Efficiency of Grain Markets in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century India," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 68(02), pages 393-437, June.

Books

  1. Studer,Roman, 2015. "The Great Divergence Reconsidered," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9781107020542.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Studer, Roman, 2008. "India and the Great Divergence: Assessing the Efficiency of Grain Markets in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century India," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 68(02), pages 393-437, June.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Markets & Famine: Amartya Sen is not the last word !
      by pseudoerasmus in Pseudoerasmus on 2015-06-08 17:33:42

Working papers

  1. Studer, Roman, 2009. "Does trade explain Europe’s rise? Geography, market size and economic development," Economic History Working Papers 27877, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.

    Cited by:

    1. Uebele, Martin, 2011. "National and international market integration in the 19th century: Evidence from comovement," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 226-242, April.

  2. Roman Studer, 2007. "India and the Great Divergence: Assessing the Efficiency of Grain Markets in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century India," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _068, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.

    Cited by:

    1. Dan Bogart & Latika Chaudhary & Alfonso Herranz-Loncan, 2015. "The Growth Contribution of Colonial Indian Railways in Comparative Perspective," CEH Discussion Papers 033, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    2. Robartus J. van der Spek & Bas van Leeuwen, 2013. "Quantifying the integration of the Babylonian economy in the Mediterranean world using a new corpus of price data, 400-50 BC," Working Papers 0047, Utrecht University, Centre for Global Economic History.
    3. Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2009. "Five Centuries of Latin American Inequality," NBER Working Papers 15305, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Fenske, James & Kala, Namrata, 2017. "Linguistic Distance and Market Integration in India," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 331, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    5. Allen, Robert C., 2014. "American Exceptionalism as a Problem in Global History," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 74(02), pages 309-350, June.
    6. David Chilosi & Tommy E. Murphy & Roman Studer, 2011. "Europe’s Many Integrations: Geography and Grain Markets, 1620-1913," Working Papers 412, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
    7. Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2010. "Latin American Growth-Inequality Trade-Offs: The Impact of Insurgence and Independence," NBER Working Papers 15680, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Paul David & S. Ryan Johansson and Andrea Pozzi, 2010. "The Demography of an Early Mortality Transition: Life Expectancy, Survival and Mortality Rates for Britain's Royals, 1500-1799," Economics Series Working Papers Number 83, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    9. Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2009. "History without Evidence: Latin American Inequality since 1491," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 3, Courant Research Centre PEG.
    10. Stefan Mann & Henry Wüstemann, 2010. "Efficiency and utility: an evolutionary perspective," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 37(9), pages 676-685, August.
    11. Chilosi, David & Federico, Giovanni, 2015. "Early globalizations: the integration of Asia in the world economy, 1800–1938," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 64785, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    12. Andrabi, Tahir & Kuehlwein, Michael, 2010. "Railways and Price Convergence in British India," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 70(02), pages 351-377, June.
    13. Marks, Daan, 2010. "Unity or diversity? On the integration and efficiency of rice markets in Indonesia, c. 1920-2006," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 47(3), pages 310-324, July.
    14. Brunt, Liam & Cannon, Edmund, 2013. "Integration in the English wheat market 1770-1820," Discussion Paper Series in Economics 12/2013, Norwegian School of Economics, Department of Economics.
    15. Williamson, Jeffrey G., 2009. "History without evidence: Latin American inequality since 1491," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 81, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    16. Wolfgang Keller & Carol H. Shiue, 2016. "Market Integration as a Mechanism of Growth," CESifo Working Paper Series 6070, CESifo Group Munich.
    17. Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2015. "Latin American Inequality: Colonial Origins, Commodity Booms, or a Missed 20th Century Leveling?," NBER Working Papers 20915, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    18. Ke Yao & Xiao-Ping Zheng, 2016. "A Comparison of Market Integration in Nineteenth-Century China and Japan," Australian Economic History Review, Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 56(3), pages 246-271, November.
    19. Chilosi, David & Volckart, Oliver, 2009. "Money, states and empire: financial integration cycles and institutional change in Central Europe, 1400-1520," Economic History Working Papers 27884, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    20. Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2009. "History without Evidence: Latin American Inequality since 1491," NBER Working Papers 14766, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    21. Cormac Ó Gráda, 2008. "The ripple that drowns? Twentieth-century famines in China and India as economic history-super-1," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 61(s1), pages 5-37, August.

Articles

  1. Chilosi, David & Murphy, Tommy E. & Studer, Roman & Tunçer, A. Coşkun, 2013. "Europe's many integrations: Geography and grain markets, 1620–1913," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 46-68.

    Cited by:

    1. Johnson, Noel D. & Koyama, Mark, 2017. "States and economic growth: Capacity and constraints," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 1-20.
    2. Broadberry, Stephen & Gardner, Leigh, 2016. "Economic Development In Africa And Europe: Reciprocal Comparisons," Revista de Historia Económica, Cambridge University Press, vol. 34(01), pages 11-37, March.
    3. Chilosi, David, 2014. "Risky institutions: political regimes and the cost of public borrowing in early modern Italy," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 59571, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    4. Mickaël Benaim & Faustine Perrin, 2017. "Regional Patterns of Economic Development. A Typology of French Departments during the Industrialization," Working Papers 04-17, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC).
    5. Ke Yao & Xiao-Ping Zheng, 2016. "A Comparison of Market Integration in Nineteenth-Century China and Japan," Australian Economic History Review, Economic History Society of Australia and New Zealand, vol. 56(3), pages 246-271, November.

  2. Studer, Roman, 2008. "India and the Great Divergence: Assessing the Efficiency of Grain Markets in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century India," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 68(02), pages 393-437, June. See citations under working paper version above.

Books

  1. Studer,Roman, 2015. "The Great Divergence Reconsidered," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9781107020542.

    Cited by:

    1. Daniel Bernhofen & Markus Eberhardt & Jianan Li & Stephen Morgan, 2015. "Assessing Market (Dis)Integration in Early Modern China and Europe," Discussion Papers 2015-12, University of Nottingham, GEP.
    2. Peter H. Lindert, 2016. "Purchasing Power Disparity before 1914," NBER Working Papers 22896, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 1 paper announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-CWA: Central & Western Asia (1) 2008-05-10
  2. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (1) 2008-05-10
  3. NEP-INT: International Trade (1) 2008-05-10

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