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Money, states and empire: financial integration cycles and institutional change in Central Europe, 1400-1520

  • David Chilosi
  • Oliver Volckart

By analysing a newly compiled database of exchange rates, this paper finds that Central European financial integration advanced in a cyclical fashion over the fifteenth century. The cycles were associated with changes in the money supply. Long-distance financial integration progressed in connection with the rise of the territorial state, facilitated by the synergy between princes and emperor.

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File URL: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/27884/
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Paper provided by London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History in its series Economic History Working Papers with number 27884.

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Length: 74 pages
Date of creation: Dec 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ehl:wpaper:27884
Contact details of provider: Postal: LSE, Dept. of Economic History Houghton Street London, WC2A 2AE, U.K.
Phone: +44 (0) 20 7955 7084
Web page: http://www.lse.ac.uk/economicHistory/

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