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Oliver Volckart

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Personal Details

First Name:Oliver
Middle Name:
Last Name:Volckart
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pvo91
Email:
Homepage:http://www.lse.ac.uk/collections/economicHistory/whosWho/profiles/o.j.volckart@lse.ac.uk.htm
Postal Address:London School of Economics and Political Science Houghton Street London WC2A 2AE United Kingdom
Phone:+44 (0)20 7955 7861
Location: London, United Kingdom
Homepage: http://www.lse.ac.uk/economicHistory/
Email:
Phone: +44 (0) 20 7955 7084
Fax:
Postal: Houghton Street, London WC2A 2AE
Handle: RePEc:edi:chlseuk (more details at EDIRC)
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  1. David Chilosi & Oliver Volckart, 2010. "Good or bad money?: debasement, society and the state in the late Middle Ages," Economic History Working Papers 27946, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
  2. Sibylle Lehmann & Oliver Volckart, 2010. "The Political Economy of Agricultural Protection: Sweden 1887," Working Paper Series of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods 2010_08, Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods.
  3. David Chilosi & Oliver Volckart, 2010. "Books or bullion? Printing, mining and financial integration in Central Europe from the 1460s," Economic History Working Papers 28986, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
  4. Lars Boerner & Oliver Volckart, 2010. "The utility of a common coinage: currency unions and the integration of money markets in late medieval Central Europe," Economic History Working Papers 29409, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
  5. David Chilosi & Oliver Volckart, 2009. "Money, states and empire: financial integration cycles and institutional change in Central Europe, 1400-1520," Economic History Working Papers 27884, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
  6. Oliver Volckart, 2008. "‘The big problem of the petty coins’, and how it could be solved in the late Middle Ages," Economic History Working Papers 22310, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
  7. Oliver Volckart, 2007. "Rules, Discretion or Reputation? Monetary Policies and the Efficiency of Financial Markets in Germany, 14th to 16th Centuries," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2007-007, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
  8. Oliver Volckart, 2006. "The Influence of Information Costs on the Integration of Financial Markets: Northern Europe, 1350-1560," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2006-049, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
  9. Volckart, Oliver & Wolf, Nikolaus, 2004. "Estimating medieval market integration: Evidence from exchange rates," Discussion Papers 2004/21, Free University Berlin, School of Business & Economics.
  10. Oliver Volckart, 2003. "Bureau competition and economic policies in Nazi Germany, 1933-39," Economic History Working Papers 22349, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
  1. Boerner, Lars & Volckart, Oliver, 2011. "The utility of a common coinage: Currency unions and the integration of money markets in late Medieval Central Europe," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 53-65, January.
  2. Chilosi, David & Volckart, Oliver, 2011. "Money, States, and Empire: Financial Integration and Institutional Change in Central Europe, 1400–1520," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 71(03), pages 762-791, September.
  3. Lehmann, Sibylle & Volckart, Oliver, 2011. "The political economy of agricultural protection: Sweden 1887," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 15(01), pages 29-59, April.
  4. Volckart, Oliver & Wolf, Nikolaus, 2006. "Estimating Financial Integration in the Middle Ages: What Can We Learn from a TAR Model?," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 66(01), pages 122-139, March.
  5. Oliver Volckart, 2005. "Book Review," Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics (JITE), Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 161(1), pages 189-190, March.
  6. Oliver Volckart, 2004. "Village Communities as Cartels: Problems of Collective Action and their Solutions in Medieval and Early Modern Central Europe," Homo Oeconomicus, Institute of SocioEconomics, vol. 21, pages 21-40.
  7. Oliver Volckart, 2004. "In Introduction: Explaining History – Neo-Institutionalism in Perspective," Homo Oeconomicus, Institute of SocioEconomics, vol. 21, pages 1-20.
  8. Volckart, Oliver, 2004. "The economics of feuding in late medieval Germany," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 41(3), pages 282-299, July.
  9. Oliver Volckart, 2002. "Why Did the German Bourgeoisie Imitate the Nobility?: a Rational-Choice-Analysis of Bourgeois Behavior in Wilhelmine Germany," Homo Oeconomicus, Institute of SocioEconomics, vol. 18, pages 501-521.
  10. Volckart, Oliver, 2002. "Central Europe's way to a market economy, 1000 1800," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 6(03), pages 309-337, December.
  11. Oliver Volckart, 2002. "No Utopia: Government Without Territorial Monopoly in Medieval Central Europe," Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics (JITE), Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 158(2), pages 325-, June.
  12. Volckart, Oliver, 2000. "State Building by Bargaining for Monopoly Rents," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 53(3), pages 265-91.
  13. Volckart, Oliver, 2000. "The open constitution and its enemies: competition, rent seeking, and the rise of the modern state," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 1-17, May.
  14. Oliver Volckart & Antje Mangels, 1999. "Are the Roots of the Modern Lex Mercatoria Really Medieval?," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 65(3), pages 427-450, January.
  15. Oliver Volckart, 1997. "Early beginnings of the quantity theory of money and their context in Polish and Prussian monetary policies, c. 1520–1550," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 50(3), pages 430-449, 08.
4 papers by this author were announced in NEP, and specifically in the following field reports (number of papers):
  1. NEP-AGR: Agricultural Economics (1) 2010-03-28. Author is listed
  2. NEP-FMK: Financial Markets (1) 2006-07-02. Author is listed
  3. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (4) 2006-07-02 2007-02-10 2010-03-28 2011-05-30. Author is listed
  4. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (1) 2007-02-10. Author is listed
  5. NEP-MON: Monetary Economics (1) 2007-02-10. Author is listed
  6. NEP-POL: Positive Political Economics (1) 2010-03-28. Author is listed

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