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Once more: When did globalisation begin?

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  • O'ROURKE, KEVIN H.
  • WILLIAMSON, JEFFREY G.

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  • O'Rourke, Kevin H. & Williamson, Jeffrey G., 2004. "Once more: When did globalisation begin?," European Review of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 8(01), pages 109-117, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:ereveh:v:8:y:2004:i:01:p:109-117_00
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    Cited by:

    1. Klein, Alexander & Leunig, Tim, 2013. "Gibrat's Law and the British industrial revolution," Economic History Working Papers 58363, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    2. Jan De Vries, 2010. "The limits of globalization in the early modern world," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 63(3), pages 710-733, August.
    3. Willem H. Boshoff & Johan Fourie, 2015. "When did globalization begin in South Africa?," Working Papers 10/2015, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
    4. Samuel Standaert & Stijn Ronsse & Benjamin Vandermarliere, 2016. "Historical trade integration: globalization and the distance puzzle in the long twentieth century," Cliometrica, Springer;Cliometric Society (Association Francaise de Cliométrie), vol. 10(2), pages 225-250, May.
    5. Chilosi, David & Murphy, Tommy E. & Studer, Roman & Tunçer, A. Coşkun, 2013. "Europe's many integrations: Geography and grain markets, 1620–1913," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 46-68.
    6. Kym Anderson & Vicente Pinilla, 2018. "What’s in the annual database of Global Wine Markets, 1835 to 2016?," Documentos de Trabajo de la Sociedad Española de Historia Agraria 1802, Sociedad Española de Historia Agraria.
    7. Dobado-González, Rafael, 2013. "La globalización hispana del comercio y el arte en la Edad Moderna
      [The hispanic globalization of commerce and art in the early modern era]
      ," MPRA Paper 51112, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Angus Maddison & Pierre van der Eng, 2013. "Asia's role in the global economy in historical perspective," CEH Discussion Papers 021, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    9. David Harvey & Neil Kellard & Jakob Madsen & Mark Wohar, 2012. "Trends and Cycles in Real Commodity Prices: 1650-2010," CEH Discussion Papers 010, Centre for Economic History, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.

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