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The European Grain Invasion, 1870–1913

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  • O'Rourke, Kevin H.

Abstract

The article quantifies the impact of cheap grain on the European economy in the late nineteenth century. Falling transport costs led to dramatic declines in Anglo-American grain price gaps, but price convergence was less impressive between the U.S. and other European economies, and within Europe. Cheaper grain meant lower rents throughout Europe, and protection boosted rents, but the magnitudes involved differed between countries. Similarly, cheap grain increased real wages in Britain, but lowered them elsewhere. The grain invasion implied different shocks across countries, and this partly explains the varying trade policies pursued in Europe during this period.

Suggested Citation

  • O'Rourke, Kevin H., 1997. "The European Grain Invasion, 1870–1913," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 57(4), pages 775-801, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:jechis:v:57:y:1997:i:04:p:775-801_01
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    Cited by:

    1. H. O'Rourke, Kevin, 2000. "British trade policy in the 19th century: a review article1," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 16(4), pages 829-842, November.
    2. Gray, Rowena & Narciso, Gaia & Tortorici, Gaspare, 2019. "Globalization, agricultural markets and mass migration: Italy, 1881–1912," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 74(C).
    3. Chilosi, David & Murphy, Tommy E. & Studer, Roman & Tunçer, A. Coşkun, 2013. "Europe's many integrations: Geography and grain markets, 1620–1913," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 46-68.
    4. Uebele, Martin, 2011. "National and international market integration in the 19th century: Evidence from comovement," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 226-242, April.
    5. Goodwin, Barry K. & Grennes, Thomas J. & Craig, Lee A., 2002. "Mechanical Refrigeration and the Integration of Perishable Commodity Markets," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 154-182, April.
    6. Green, Alan G. & Sparks, Gordon R., 1999. "Population Growth and the Dynamics of Canadian Development: A Multivariate Time Series Approach," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 56-71, January.
    7. Krausmann, Fridolin & Langthaler, Ernst, 2019. "Food regimes and their trade links: A socio-ecological perspective," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 160(C), pages 87-95.
    8. Betrán, Concha & Pons, Maria A., 2011. "Labour market response to globalisation: Spain, 1880-1913," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 169-188, April.

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