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Natural resources and the spread of HIV/AIDS: Curse or blessing?

Listed author(s):
  • Sterck, Olivier

This paper answers two questions: “What impact have natural resources had on the spread of the HIV epidemic so far?” and “What role can natural resource rents play in order to finance the long-run response to HIV/AIDS?” Using a panel dataset covering 137 countries from 1990 until 2008, de Soysa and Gizelis (2013) provided evidence in Social Science & Medicine that oil-rich countries are more deeply affected by the HIV and TB epidemics. They concluded that government of resource-rich countries failed to implement effective public policies for dealing with the epidemics. In this paper, I show that their results are (1) not robust, (2) based on an inappropriate choice of dependent variable and (3) spurious because series are non-stationary. After correcting for these issues, I find no robust relationship between resource rents and the spread of HIV and TB. The paper concludes by emphasizing the potential of natural resources rents for financing the long-term liability brought about by the HIV/AIDS epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Social Science & Medicine.

Volume (Year): 150 (2016)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 271-278

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Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:150:y:2016:i:c:p:271-278
DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2015.09.023
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