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Human capital and natural resource dependence

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  • Kim, Dong-Hyeon
  • Lin, Shu-Chin

Abstract

This paper offers an evaluation of the contribution of natural resource dependence to human capital. Two aspects of human capital are examined: education and health. Using a panel time series approach and a large cross-country dataset, it finds that natural resource dependence improves education but worsens health. It is also found that agricultural exports lower education and health whereas non-agricultural primary exports promote both. Finally, large differences in the relationships are detected across countries, depending upon a country’s economic and sociopolitical institutions.

Suggested Citation

  • Kim, Dong-Hyeon & Lin, Shu-Chin, 2017. "Human capital and natural resource dependence," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 92-102.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:streco:v:40:y:2017:i:c:p:92-102
    DOI: 10.1016/j.strueco.2017.01.002
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    Keywords

    Education; Health; Natural resource dependence; Heterogeneous panels;

    JEL classification:

    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • Q33 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Resource Booms (Dutch Disease)

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