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Bank to sovereign risk spillovers across borders: Evidence from the ECB’s Comprehensive Assessment

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  • Breckenfelder, Johannes
  • Schwaab, Bernd

Abstract

We study spillovers from bank to sovereign risk in the euro area using difference specifications around the European Central Bank’s release of stress test results for 130 significant banks on October 26, 2014. We document that following this information release bank equity prices in stressed countries declined. Surprisingly, bank risk in stressed countries was not absorbed by their sovereigns but spilled over to non-stressed euro area sovereigns. As a result, in non-stressed countries, the co-movement between sovereign and bank risk increased. This suggests that market participants perceived that bank risk is shared within the euro area.

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  • Breckenfelder, Johannes & Schwaab, Bernd, 2018. "Bank to sovereign risk spillovers across borders: Evidence from the ECB’s Comprehensive Assessment," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 247-262.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:empfin:v:49:y:2018:i:c:p:247-262
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jempfin.2018.08.001
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    Cited by:

    1. Alogoskoufis, Spyros & Langfield, Sam, 2018. "Regulating the doom loop," ESRB Working Paper Series 74, European Systemic Risk Board.
    2. Böhm, Hannes & Eichler, Stefan, 2018. "Avoiding the fall into the loop: Isolating the transmission of bank-to-sovereign distress in the euro area and its drivers," IWH Discussion Papers 19/2018, Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Bank-sovereign nexus; Risk spillovers; Stress test; European Central Bank; Comprehensive Assessment;

    JEL classification:

    • C68 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computable General Equilibrium Models
    • F34 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Lending and Debt Problems

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