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Catholic school effectiveness in Australia: A reassessment using selection on observed and unobserved variables

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  • Cardak, Buly A.
  • Vecci, Joe

Abstract

This paper provides new estimates of the effect of Catholic school attendance on high school completion and university commencement and completion for Australian students. Without a set of robust instruments to deal with any potential selection bias, we place bounds on the Catholic school effect using the assumption of equality between selection on observables and unobservables. The effect of Catholic school attendance is found to be smaller than previous results and negative treatment effects cannot be ruled out. A number of explanations for the decline in the Catholic school effect are considered. These include resource differences, growth in disadvantaged student enrolments in Catholic schools and changes in the school and university sectors in Australia.

Suggested Citation

  • Cardak, Buly A. & Vecci, Joe, 2013. "Catholic school effectiveness in Australia: A reassessment using selection on observed and unobserved variables," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 34-45.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:37:y:2013:i:c:p:34-45
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econedurev.2013.08.003
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    1. Kim, Young-Joo, 2011. "Catholic schools or school quality? The effects of Catholic schools on labor market outcomes," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 546-558, June.
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    7. Cohen-Zada, Danny & Elder, Todd, 2009. "Historical religious concentrations and the effects of Catholic schooling," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(1), pages 65-74, July.
    8. Cardak, Buly A. & Vecci, Joe, 2013. "Catholic school effectiveness in Australia: A reassessment using selection on observed and unobserved variables," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 34-45.
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    12. Cohen-Zada, D., 2009. "An alternative instrument for private school competition," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 29-37, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Brendan Houng & Moshe Justman, 2015. "Out-Of-Sample Predictions Of Access To Higher Education And School Value-Added," Working Papers 1511, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Department of Economics.
    2. Cardak, Buly A. & Vecci, Joe, 2013. "Catholic school effectiveness in Australia: A reassessment using selection on observed and unobserved variables," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 34-45.
    3. Nghiem, Son & Nguyen, Ha & Connelly, Luke, 2014. "The Efficiency of Australian Schools: Evidence from the NAPLAN Data 2009-2011," MPRA Paper 56231, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Mahuteau, Stephane & Mavromaras, Kostas G., 2014. "Student Scores in Public and Private Schools: Evidence from PISA 2009," IZA Discussion Papers 8471, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Coughlin, Conor & Castilla, Carolina, 2014. "The effect of private high school education on the college trajectory," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 125(2), pages 200-203.
    6. Jha Nikhil & Polidano Cain, 2015. "Long-Run Effects of Catholic Schooling on Wages," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 15(4), pages 2017-2045, October.
    7. Chris Sakellariou, 2016. "The “true” private school effect across countries using PISA-2012 Mathematics," Economic Growth Centre Working Paper Series 1605, Nanyang Technological University, School of Social Sciences, Economic Growth Centre.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Catholic schools; High school completion; University attendance; Selection bias;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education

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