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Impact of private secondary schooling on cognitive skills: evidence from India

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  • Mehtabul Azam
  • Geeta Kingdon
  • Kin Bing Wu

Abstract

We examine the effect of attending private secondary school on educational achievement, as measured by students' scores in a comprehensive standardized math test, in two Indian states: Orissa and Rajasthan. We use propensity score matching (PSM) to control for any systematic differences between students attending private secondary schools and public secondary schools, and assess the sensitivity of our estimates with respect to unobservables using the Rosenbaum bounds. We find that students in private schools in rural (urban) Rajasthan scored about 1.3 (0.4) standard deviation (SD) higher than their counterparts in the public schools. Importantly, the positive private school impact in rural (urban) Rajasthan survives a large (moderate) amount of positive selection on unobservables. We do not find statistically significant difference in urban Orissa, while a positive impact of 0.3 SD in rural Orissa is susceptible to small amount of positive selection on unobservables.

Suggested Citation

  • Mehtabul Azam & Geeta Kingdon & Kin Bing Wu, 2016. "Impact of private secondary schooling on cognitive skills: evidence from India," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(5), pages 465-480, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:edecon:v:24:y:2016:i:5:p:465-480
    DOI: 10.1080/09645292.2015.1110116
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Deepti Goel & Bidisha Barooah, 2018. "Drivers of Student Performance: Evidence from Higher Secondary Public Schools in Delhi," Working Papers id:12881, eSocialSciences.
    2. Deepti Goel & Bidisha Barooah, 2018. "Drivers of Student Performance: Evidence from Higher Secondary Public Schools in Delhi," Working papers 289, Centre for Development Economics, Delhi School of Economics.
    3. Goel, Deepti & Barooah, Bidisha, 2018. "Drivers of Student Performance: Evidence from Higher Secondary Public Schools in Delhi," IZA Discussion Papers 11670, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Goel, Deepti & Barooah, Bidisha, 2018. "Drivers of Student Performance: Evidence from Higher Secondary Public Schools in Delhi," GLO Discussion Paper Series 231, Global Labor Organization (GLO).

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