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Constrained School Choice in Egypt

Author

Listed:
  • Krafft, Caroline
  • Elbadawy, Asmaa
  • Sieverding, Maia

Abstract

This paper examines patterns of school choice in Egypt from primary through higher education. We use a mixed-methods approach that combines survey data with qualitative in-depth interviews to explore schooling decisions. Some private and religious schools exist, but we find that in most geographic areas school “choice” at the pre-university level is effectively limited to public schools—despite their inadequate quality. Although there has not been much change in the attendance of private schools at the pre-university level, we find that attendance of private higher education institutions has increased over time. Azhari (Islamic religious) school attendance at the pre-university level has increased over time as well, possibly indicating a reaction to the low quality of public schools. Overall, when choices are available, families still tend to prefer public schools due to their low cost, though private and religious schools are generally perceived to be of higher quality.

Suggested Citation

  • Krafft, Caroline & Elbadawy, Asmaa & Sieverding, Maia, 2017. "Constrained School Choice in Egypt," GLO Discussion Paper Series 134, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:134
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    File URL: https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/170572/1/GLO-DP-0134.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Krafft, Caroline & Alawode, Halimat, 2018. "Inequality of opportunity in higher education in the Middle East and North Africa," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 234-244.
    2. Sieverding, Maia & Krafft, Caroline & Elbadawy, Asmaa, 2017. "“The Teacher Does Not Explain in Class”: An Exploration of the Drivers of Private Tutoring in Egypt," GLO Discussion Paper Series 135, Global Labor Organization (GLO).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    education; school choice; private schooling; religious education; inequality of opportunity; Egypt;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I22 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Educational Finance; Financial Aid
    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • N35 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - Asia including Middle East

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