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The Effect Of Islamic Secondary School Attendance On Academic Achievement

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  • M. NIAZ ASADULLAH

    (Faculty of Economics and Administration, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia2Department of Economics, University of Reading, Reading, UK3Centre on Skills, Knowledge and Organisational Performance (SKOPE), University of Oxford, Oxford, OX2 6PY, UK4IZA, University of Bonn, 53113 Bonn, Germany)

Abstract

Using unique survey data on rural secondary school children, this paper evaluates the relative quality of Islamic secondary schools (i.e., madrasahs) in Bangladesh. Students attending registered madrasahs fare worse in maths and English than students attending non-madrasah schools. However, failure to account for non-random sorting overestimates the negative influence of madrasahs on student’s achievement. Evidence on the magnitude of this bias is presented. Once selection effect is taken into account, the madrasah’s disadvantage in English is small while that in maths becomes insignificant. Given the overall low level of achievement, this suggests that madrasah students perform just as poorly as those from non-madrasah schools in rural Bangladesh.

Suggested Citation

  • M. Niaz Asadullah, 2016. "The Effect Of Islamic Secondary School Attendance On Academic Achievement," The Singapore Economic Review (SER), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 61(04), pages 1-24, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:wsi:serxxx:v:61:y:2016:i:04:n:s0217590815500526
    DOI: 10.1142/S0217590815500526
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    Cited by:

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    2. Asadullah, M. Niaz & Trannoy, Alain & Tubeuf, Sandy & Yalonetzky, Gaston, 2021. "Measuring educational inequality of opportunity: pupil’s effort matters," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 138(C).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Instrumental variable; madrasahs; school quality; Bangladesh;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D04 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Microeconomic Policy: Formulation; Implementation; Evaluation
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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