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Decomposing the Monetary Policy Multiplier

Author

Listed:
  • Pietro Alessandrini
  • Òscar Jordà
  • Fabrizio Venditti

Abstract

Financial markets play an important role in generating monetary policy transmission asymmetries in the US. Credit spreads only adjust to unexpected increases in interest rates, causing output and prices to respond more to a monetary tightening than to an expansion. At a one year horizon, the ‘financial multiplier’ of monetary policy—defined as the ratio between the cumulative responses of employment and credit spreads—is zero for a monetary expansion, -2 for a monetary tightening, and -4 for a monetary tightening that takes place under strained credit market conditions. These results have important policy implications: the central bank may inadvertently over-tighten in times of financial uncertainty.

Suggested Citation

  • Pietro Alessandrini & Òscar Jordà & Fabrizio Venditti, 2023. "Decomposing the Monetary Policy Multiplier," Working Paper Series 2023-14, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedfwp:96263
    DOI: 10.24148/wp2023-14
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    monetary policy; credit spreads; local projections; Kitagawa decomposition;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C13 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Estimation: General
    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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