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When It Cannot Get Better or Worse: The Asymmetric Impact of Good and Bad News on Bond Returns in Expansions and Recessions

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  • Alessandro Beber
  • Michael W. Brandt

Abstract

We examine empirically the response of bond returns and their volatility to good and bad macroeconomic news during expansions and recessions. We find that macroeconomic announcements are most important when they contain bad news for bond returns in expansions and, to a lesser extent, good news in contractions. In expansions, the bond market responds most strongly to bad news in non-farm payrolls, while in recessions good news about inflation is relatively more important. We also document that macroeconomic news impacts the volatility of bond returns at all maturities by increasing jump intensities and altering the jump size distribution. Copyright 2010, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Alessandro Beber & Michael W. Brandt, 2010. "When It Cannot Get Better or Worse: The Asymmetric Impact of Good and Bad News on Bond Returns in Expansions and Recessions," Review of Finance, European Finance Association, vol. 14(1), pages 119-155.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:revfin:v:14:y:2010:i:1:p:119-155
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    Cited by:

    1. Anne Opschoor & Michel van der Wel & Dick van Dijk & Nick Taylor, 2011. "On the Effects of Private Information on Volatility," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 11-077/4, Tinbergen Institute.
    2. Piergiorgio Alessandri & Antonio M. Conti & Fabrizio Venditti, 2016. "The Financial Stability Dark Side of Monetary Policy," BCAM Working Papers 1601, Birkbeck Centre for Applied Macroeconomics.
    3. Paiardini, Paola, 2014. "The impact of economic news on bond prices: Evidence from the MTS platform," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 302-322.
    4. repec:eee:empfin:v:43:y:2017:i:c:p:43-58 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Rangel, José Gonzalo, 2011. "Macroeconomic news, announcements, and stock market jump intensity dynamics," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 1263-1276, May.
    6. López, Raquel, 2015. "Do stylized facts of equity-based volatility indices apply to fixed-income volatility indices? Evidence from the US Treasury market," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 292-303.
    7. López-Espinosa, Germán & Moreno, Antonio & Rubia, Antonio & Valderrama, Laura, 2015. "Systemic risk and asymmetric responses in the financial industry," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 471-485.
    8. Loh, Roger & Stulz, Rene M., 2013. "Is Sell-Side Research More Valuable in Bad Times?," Working Paper Series 2013-19, Ohio State University, Charles A. Dice Center for Research in Financial Economics.
    9. Chan, Kam Fong & Powell, John G. & Treepongkaruna, Sirimon, 2014. "Currency jumps and crises: Do developed and emerging market currencies jump together?," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 132-157.
    10. Nieto, Belén & Rubio, Gonzalo, 2011. "The volatility of consumption-based stochastic discount factors and economic cycles," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 35(9), pages 2197-2216, September.
    11. Kim, Suk-Joong & Salem, Leith & Wu, Eliza, 2015. "The role of macroeconomic news in sovereign CDS markets: Domestic and spillover news effects from the U.S., the Eurozone and China," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 18(C), pages 208-224.
    12. Amira, Khaled & Taamouti, Abderrahim & Tsafack, Georges, 2011. "What drives international equity correlations? Volatility or market direction?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 1234-1263, October.
    13. Marcello Pericoli & Giovanni Veronese, 2015. "Forecaster heterogeneity, surprises and financial markets," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1020, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    14. Chan, Kam Fong & Bowman, Robert G. & Neely, Christopher J., 2017. "Systematic cojumps, market component portfolios and scheduled macroeconomic announcements," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 43-58.
    15. Opschoor, Anne & Taylor, Nick & van der Wel, Michel & van Dijk, Dick, 2014. "Order flow and volatility: An empirical investigation," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 185-201.
    16. León, Ángel & Sebestyén, Szabolcs, 2012. "New measures of monetary policy surprises and jumps in interest rates," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 36(8), pages 2323-2343.
    17. Robert Brooks & Robert Faff & Sirimon Treepongkaruna & Eliza Wu, 2015. "Do Sovereign Re-Ratings Destabilize Equity Markets during Financial Crises? New Evidence from Higher Return Moments," Journal of Business Finance & Accounting, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 42(5-6), pages 777-799, June.
    18. Löffler, Gunter & Posch, Peter N, 2013. "Wall Street’s bailout bet: Market reactions to house price releases in the presence of bailout expectations," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(12), pages 5147-5158.
    19. Edgardo Cayón, 2014. "The Effects of Contagion During the Global Financial Crisis in Government-Regulated and Sponsored Assets in Emerging Markets," PhD Thesis, Finance Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney, number 30, June.
    20. Dick van Dijk & Robin L. Lumsdaine & Michel van der Wel, 2014. "Market Set-Up in Advance of Federal Reserve Policy Decisions," NBER Working Papers 19814, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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