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Developing Customer Solutions for Subsistence Marketplaces in Emerging Economies: a Bottom–Up 3C (Customer, Community, and Context) Approach

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  • Srinivas Venugopal

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  • Madhubalan Viswanathan

Abstract

This article demonstrates why and how bottom–up understanding and local collaboration can enable outside entities to design context-sensitive solutions in subsistence marketplaces in emerging markets. Using the literature, we argue that external entities need to understand subsistence marketplaces from the bottom–up in terms of customers/consumers, communities, and the larger context. In turn, they should design context-sensitive core solutions that involve a true collaboration with the preexisting entrepreneurial ecosystem. We use a case study where the first author had direct involvement in implementation to abstract generalizable insights and further assess our arguments with two other case studies from a different organizational context. We draw on these insights to derive implications for marketing management in subsistence marketplaces. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Suggested Citation

  • Srinivas Venugopal & Madhubalan Viswanathan, 2015. "Developing Customer Solutions for Subsistence Marketplaces in Emerging Economies: a Bottom–Up 3C (Customer, Community, and Context) Approach," Customer Needs and Solutions, Springer;Institute for Sustainable Innovation and Growth (iSIG), vol. 2(4), pages 325-336, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:custns:v:2:y:2015:i:4:p:325-336
    DOI: 10.1007/s40547-015-0050-3
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Webb, Justin W. & Bruton, Garry D. & Tihanyi, Laszlo & Ireland, R. Duane, 2013. "Research on entrepreneurship in the informal economy: Framing a research agenda," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 28(5), pages 598-614.
    2. Natalie Ross Adkins & Julie L. Ozanne, 2005. "The Low Literate Consumer," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 32(1), pages 93-105, June.
    3. Ted London & Stuart L Hart, 2004. "Reinventing strategies for emerging markets: beyond the transnational model," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Academy of International Business, vol. 35(5), pages 350-370, September.
    4. Robert M. Townsend, 1995. "Consumption Insurance: An Evaluation of Risk-Bearing Systems in Low-Income Economies," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(3), pages 83-102, Summer.
    5. Rüdiger Hahn, 2009. "The Ethical Rational of Business for the Poor – Integrating the Concepts Bottom of the Pyramid, Sustainable Development, and Corporate Citizenship," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 84(3), pages 313-324, February.
    6. Jonathan Morduch, 1995. "Income Smoothing and Consumption Smoothing," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(3), pages 103-114, Summer.
    7. Kochar, Anjini, 1995. "Explaining Household Vulnerability to Idiosyncratic Income Shocks," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(2), pages 159-164, May.
    8. Alderman, Harold & Garcia, Marito, 1993. "Poverty, household food security, and nutrition in rural Pakistan:," Research reports 96, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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    Cited by:

    1. Barrington, D.J. & Sridharan, S. & Saunders, S.G. & Souter, R.T. & Bartram, J. & Shields, K.F. & Meo, S. & Kearton, A. & Hughes, R.K., 2016. "Improving community health through marketing exchanges: A participatory action research study on water, sanitation, and hygiene in three Melanesian countries," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 171(C), pages 84-93.
    2. repec:spr:amsrev:v:6:y:2016:i:3:d:10.1007_s13162-016-0086-z is not listed on IDEAS

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