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Consumption and Vulnerability Among Foragers and Horticulturalists in the Rainforest of Honduras

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  • Wong, Grace Y.
  • Godoy, Ricardo

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  • Wong, Grace Y. & Godoy, Ricardo, 2003. "Consumption and Vulnerability Among Foragers and Horticulturalists in the Rainforest of Honduras," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(8), pages 1405-1419, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:31:y:2003:i:8:p:1405-1419
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Deaton, A., 1989. "Saving in Developing Contries: Theory and Review," Papers 144, Princeton, Woodrow Wilson School - Development Studies.
    2. Fafchamps, Marcel & Udry, Christopher & Czukas, Katherine, 1998. "Drought and saving in West Africa: are livestock a buffer stock?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(2), pages 273-305, April.
    3. Robert M. Townsend, 1995. "Consumption Insurance: An Evaluation of Risk-Bearing Systems in Low-Income Economies," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(3), pages 83-102, Summer.
    4. Rosenzweig, Mark R & Wolpin, Kenneth I, 1993. "Credit Market Constraints, Consumption Smoothing, and the Accumulation of Durable Production Assets in Low-Income Countries: Investment in Bullocks in India," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(2), pages 223-244, April.
    5. Bellon, Mauricio R & Taylor, J Edward, 1993. ""Folk" Soil Taxonomy and the Partial Adoption of New Seed Varieties," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 41(4), pages 763-786, July.
    6. Paul Gertler & Jonathan Gruber, 2002. "Insuring Consumption Against Illness," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(1), pages 51-70, March.
    7. Hausman, Jerry, 2015. "Specification tests in econometrics," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 38(2), pages 112-134.
    8. Paxson, Christina H, 1992. "Using Weather Variability to Estimate the Response of Savings to Transitory Income in Thailand," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(1), pages 15-33, March.
    9. Godoy, Ricardo & O'neill, Kathleen & Groff, Stephen & Kostishack, Peter & Cubas, Adoni & Demmer, Josephien & Mcsweeney, Kendra & Overman, Johannes & Wilkie, David & Brokaw, Nicholas & Martinez, Marque, 1997. "Household determinants of deforestation by amerindians in honduras," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 25(6), pages 977-987, June.
    10. Jonathan Morduch, 1995. "Income Smoothing and Consumption Smoothing," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(3), pages 103-114, Summer.
    11. Wolpin, Kenneth I, 1982. "A New Test of the Permanent Income Hypothesis: The Impact of Weather on the Income and Consumption of Farm Households in India," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 23(3), pages 583-594, October.
    12. Brush, Stephen B. & Taylor, J. Edward & Bellon, Mauricio R., 1992. "Technology adoption and biological diversity in Andean potato agriculture," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(2), pages 365-387, October.
    13. Hanan G. Jacoby & Emmanuel Skoufias, 1998. "Testing Theories of Consumption Behavior Using Information on Aggregate Shocks: Income Seasonality and Rainfall in Rural India," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 80(1), pages 1-14.
    14. Kochar, Anjini, 1995. "Explaining Household Vulnerability to Idiosyncratic Income Shocks," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(2), pages 159-164, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Degnet, Abebaw & Mburu, John & Holm-Müller, Karin, 2008. "Responding to an Income Shock through Increasing Forest Extraction: Survey Evidence from Ethiopian Coffee Farmers," Ethiopian Journal of Economics, Ethiopian Economics Association, vol. 17(2).
    2. Morsello, Carla & Delgado, Juliana Aparecida da Silva & Fonseca-Morello, Thiago & Brites, Alice Dantas, 2014. "Does trading non-timber forest products drive specialisation in products gathered for consumption? Evidence from the Brazilian Amazon," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 100(C), pages 140-149.

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