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Labour force participation and job polarization : evidence from Europe during the great recession

Author

Listed:
  • Gregory Verdugo

    (Observatoire français des conjonctures économiques)

  • Guillaume Allegre

    (Observatoire français des conjonctures économiques)

Abstract

Job polarization accelerated during the Great recession in Europe. Because of higher occupational segregation by gender and larger shocks to middling occupations that employ mostly male workers, employmentopportunities declined much more for men relative to women in Europe compared to the US. We find that the labour force participation and employment rates of women increased considerably in regions most affected by the destruction of men’s jobs, particularly for married women with less than high-school education. For men, the decline in demand in middling occupations explains some of the recent decline in their participation. For both men and women, the Great recession mostly accelerated pre-existing trends. This suggests that a large share of the recent increases in women’s participation in Europe is a response to job polarization

Suggested Citation

  • Gregory Verdugo & Guillaume Allegre, 2017. "Labour force participation and job polarization : evidence from Europe during the great recession," Sciences Po publications 2017-16, Sciences Po.
  • Handle: RePEc:spo:wpmain:info:hdl:2441/4igrl22i129kl9t3bjsriribbs
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Labour force participation; Job polarization; Women; Europe; Great Recession;

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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