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Secular Labor Reallocation and Business Cycles

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  • Gabriel Chodorow-Reich
  • Johannes Wieland

Abstract

We revisit an old question: does industry labor reallocation affect the business cycle? Our empirical methodology exploits variation in a local labor market’s exposure to industry reallocation on the basis of the area’s initial industry composition and national industry employment trends for identification. Applied to confidential employment data over 1980–2014, we find sharp evidence of reallocation contributing to higher local area unemployment if it occurs during a national recession but little difference in outcomes during an expansion. A multiarea, multisector search-and-matching model with imperfect mobility across industries and downward nominal wage rigidity can reproduce these cross-sectional patterns.

Suggested Citation

  • Gabriel Chodorow-Reich & Johannes Wieland, 2020. "Secular Labor Reallocation and Business Cycles," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 128(6), pages 2245-2287.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jpolec:doi:10.1086/705717
    DOI: 10.1086/705717
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    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Secular Labor Reallocation and Business Cycles
      by Christian Zimmermann in NEP-DGE blog on 2015-09-18 19:13:55

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    Cited by:

    1. Simona E. Cociuba & James C. MacGee, 2018. "Demographics and Sectoral Reallocations: A Search Theory with Immobile Workers," UWO Department of Economics Working Papers 20182, University of Western Ontario, Department of Economics.
    2. Verdugo, Gregory & Allègre, Guillaume, 2020. "Labour force participation and job polarization: Evidence from Europe during the Great Recession," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(C).
    3. Chodorow-Reich, Gabriel, 2020. "Regional data in macroeconomics: Some advice for practitioners," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 115(C).
    4. Lukas Mergele & Moritz Hennicke & Moritz Lubczyk, 2020. "The Big Sell: Privatizing East Germany's Economy," CESifo Working Paper Series 8566, CESifo.
    5. Lukas Mergele & Moritz Hennicke & Moritz Lubczyk, 2020. "The Big Sell: Privatizing East Germany's Economy," CESifo Working Paper Series 8566, CESifo.
    6. Marco Di Maggio & Amir Kermani, 2016. "The Importance of Unemployment Insurance as an Automatic Stabilizer," NBER Working Papers 22625, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Geng, Yong & Liu, Wei & Wu, Yuzhao, 2021. "How do zombie firms affect China’s industrial upgrading?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 97(C), pages 79-94.
    8. Mr. Geoffrey J Bannister & Ms. Elena Loukoianova & Mr. Harald Finger & Siddharth Kothari & Yosuke Kido, 2020. "Addressing the Pandemic's Medium-Term Fallout in Australia and New Zealand," IMF Working Papers 2020/272, International Monetary Fund.
    9. Alistair Dieppe, 2020. "Global Productivity," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 34015.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • J6 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers

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