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Labor Reallocation and Business Cycles

Author

Listed:
  • Johannes Wieland

    (University of California, San Diego)

  • Gabriel Chodorow-Reich

    (Harvard University)

Abstract

We provide new and robust evidence that labor reallocation affects the duration and severity of recessions, and the recovery. To circumvent the small number of national recessions, we study the effects of labor reallocation in broadly defined local labor markets in the United States.

Suggested Citation

  • Johannes Wieland & Gabriel Chodorow-Reich, 2015. "Labor Reallocation and Business Cycles," 2015 Meeting Papers 339, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:sed015:339
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    File URL: https://economicdynamics.org/meetpapers/2015/paper_339.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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