IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/fip/fedhep/y2009iqivp40-57nv.33no.4.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Employment growth: cyclical movements or structural change?

Author

Listed:
  • Ellen R. Rissman

Abstract

In judging the degree of slack in the economy, policymakers must determine the origin of any increase in the unemployment rate—specifically, how much of it is due to a cyclical slowdown (driven by the broader economy) as opposed to a structural realignment in production (driven by a shift in production from declining industries to expanding ones). The model developed in this article provides some insight into the sources and magnitude of structural change and its impact on the unemployment rate.

Suggested Citation

  • Ellen R. Rissman, 2009. "Employment growth: cyclical movements or structural change?," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue Q IV, pages 40-57.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedhep:y:2009:i:qiv:p:40-57:n:v.33no.4
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.chicagofed.org/digital_assets/publications/economic_perspectives/2009/ep_4qtr2009_part3_rissman.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Rissman, Ellen R., 1993. "Wage growth and sectoral shifts : Phillips curve redux," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 395-416, June.
    2. Arthur F. Burns & Wesley C. Mitchell, 1946. "Measuring Business Cycles," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number burn46-1, January.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Chen, Jinzhu & Kannan, Prakash & Loungani, Prakash & Trehan, Bharat, 2012. "New evidence on cyclical and structural sources of unemployment," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue March, pages 1-23.
    2. Christopher L. Foote & Richard W. Ryan, 2015. "Labor-Market Polarization over the Business Cycle," NBER Macroeconomics Annual, University of Chicago Press, vol. 29(1), pages 371-413.
    3. Reicher, Claire, 2014. "The aggregate effects of long run sectoral reallocation," Kiel Working Papers 1928, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    4. Edward P. Lazear & James R. Spletzer, 2012. "The United States labor market: status quo or a new normal?," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 405-451.
    5. Reicher, Christopher Phillip, 2011. "The aggregate effects of long run sectoral reallocation," Kiel Working Papers 1720, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    6. Reich, Michael, 2012. "Unemployment after the Great Recession: Why so High? What Can We Do?/El desempleo después de la Gran Recesión: ¿Por qué tan alto? ¿Qué podemos hacer?," Estudios de Economía Aplicada, Estudios de Economía Aplicada, vol. 30, pages 11-28, Abril.
    7. Yelena Takhtamanova & Eva Sierminska, 2012. "Distributional Impact of the Great Recession on Industry Unemployment for 1976-2011," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1233, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    8. Neil Mehrotra & Dmitriy Sergeyev, 2013. "Sectoral Shocks, the Beveridge Curve and Monetary Policy," 2013 Meeting Papers 919, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    9. Reicher, Christopher Phillip, 2011. "A tale of two countries: A comparison of the aggregate effects of sectoral reallocation in the United States and Germany," Kiel Working Papers 1721, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    10. Menzie D. Chinn, 2012. "Imbalances, Overheating and the Prospects for Global Recovery," Chapters,in: Global Economic Crisis, chapter 6 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    11. Manjola Tase, 2013. "Sectoral allocation, risk efficiency and the Great Moderation," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2013-73, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    12. Daniel Aaronson & Bhashkar Mazumder & Shani Schechter, 2010. "What is behind the rise in long-term unemployment?," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue Q II, pages 28-51.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Employment ; Business cycles;

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fip:fedhep:y:2009:i:qiv:p:40-57:n:v.33no.4. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Bernie Flores). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/frbchus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.