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New Indexes of Coincident and Leading Economic Indicators

In: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1989, Volume 4

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  • James H. Stock
  • Mark W. Watson

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  • James H. Stock & Mark W. Watson, 1989. "New Indexes of Coincident and Leading Economic Indicators," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1989, Volume 4, pages 351-409, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberch:10968
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Arthur F. Burns & Wesley C. Mitchell, 1946. "Measuring Business Cycles," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number burn46-1, May.
    2. Diebold, Francis X & Rudebusch, Glenn D, 1989. "Scoring the Leading Indicators," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 62(3), pages 369-391, July.
    3. Geoffrey H. Moore, 1983. "Business Cycles, Inflation, and Forecasting, 2nd edition," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number moor83-1, May.
    4. Victor Zarnowitz & Phillip Braun, 1989. "Major Macroeconomic Variables and Leading Indexes: Some Estimates of Their Interrelations, 1886-1982," NBER Working Papers 2812, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Neftici, Salih N., 1982. "Optimal prediction of cyclical downturns," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 4(1), pages 225-241, November.
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