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Recession, austerity and gender - a comparison of eight european labour markets

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  • Hélène Perivier

    (OFCE Sciences Po)

Abstract

The GDP collapse phase of the economic crisis has less affected female employment than male employment, whereas the austerity phase was particularly harsh for women. This gendered impact of the different stages of the crisis is described in the literature as follows: from she-cession to sh(e)austerity . This article aims to analyse the gendered trends in labour market for eight European countries. The quarterly evolution of the participation of women and men and the employment at the sectorial level are decomposed. The she-cession to sh(e)austerity scenario does not apply to all the selected countries. The other channels through which austerity policies can jeopardize gender equality and women’s rights are identified by referring to a typology of these policies.

Suggested Citation

  • Hélène Perivier, 2016. "Recession, austerity and gender - a comparison of eight european labour markets," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE 2016-05, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).
  • Handle: RePEc:fce:doctra:1605
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    File URL: http://www.ofce.sciences-po.fr/pdf/dtravail/WP2016-05.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bernard Gazier, 2008. "Flexicurité et Marchés Transitionnels du Travail : esquisse d'une réflexion normative," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-00270223, HAL.
    2. Karon Gush & James Scott & Heather Laurie, 2015. "Households’ responses to spousal job loss: ‘all change’ or ‘carry on as usual’?," Work, Employment & Society, British Sociological Association, vol. 29(5), pages 703-719, October.
    3. Lundberg, Shelly, 1985. "The Added Worker Effect," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(1), pages 11-37, January.
    4. Giannakopoulos, Nicholas, 2015. "The added worker effect of married women in Greece during the Great Depression," MPRA Paper 66298, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Kimberly Christensen, 2015. "He-cession? She-cession? The Gendered Impact of the Great Recession in the United States," Review of Radical Political Economics, Union for Radical Political Economics, vol. 47(3), pages 368-388, September.
    6. Dominique Anxo, 2011. "Negotiated Flexibility in Sweden: A More Egalitarian Response to the Crisis?," Chapters,in: Work Inequalities in the Crisis, chapter 11 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    7. Bredtmann, Julia & Otten, Sebastian & Rulff, Christian, 2014. "Husband's Unemployment and Wife's Labor Supply – The Added Worker Effect across Europe," Ruhr Economic Papers 484, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
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    Cited by:

    1. Perugini, Cristiano & Žarković Rakić, Jelena & Vladisavljević, Marko, 2016. "Austerity and gender wage inequality in EU countries," MPRA Paper 76306, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    gender; Recession; Austerity; Segregation; Economic policies; Employment;

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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