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On the evolution of individual preferences and family rules

Author

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  • Alessandro Cigno

    () (Department of Economics and Management, University of Florence, Italy; Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis)

  • Annalisa Luporini

    () (Department of Economics and Management, University of Florence, Italy)

Abstract

Assuming that the members of each sex are differentiated by an inherited trait, and that couples are formed at random because this trait is private information until marriage, we show that the distribution of the trait evolves from generation to generation as a result of mixed marriages. This will ultimately lead to everyone having the same trait. For the case where the trait is a parameter measuring a person's taste for receiving filial attention in old age, we also show that, if the pair of parameter values characterizing a couple satisfy a certain condition, it is in the couple's common interest to obey a rule requiring them to give specified amounts of attention to their respective parents. As the distribution of this parameter changes because of mixed marriages, the share of the population who obey the rule in question changes too. In the long run, everybody has the same preferences, and either everybody obeys the same rule, or nobody obeys any. The consequences of immigration and the implications for welfare policy are discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Alessandro Cigno & Annalisa Luporini, 2018. "On the evolution of individual preferences and family rules," Working Paper series 18-07, Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis.
  • Handle: RePEc:rim:rimwps:18-07
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    File URL: http://rcea.org/RePEc/pdf/wp18-07.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jesús Fernández-Villaverde & Juan F. Rubio-Ramírez, 2007. "Estimating Macroeconomic Models: A Likelihood Approach," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 74(4), pages 1059-1087.
    2. Del Negro, Marco & Schorfheide, Frank, 2008. "Forming priors for DSGE models (and how it affects the assessment of nominal rigidities)," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(7), pages 1191-1208, October.
    3. Jesús Fernández-Villaverde & Juan F. Rubio-Ramírez & Manuel S. Santos, 2006. "Convergence Properties of the Likelihood of Computed Dynamic Models," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 74(1), pages 93-119, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Caiani, Alessandro & Godin, Antoine & Caverzasi, Eugenio & Gallegati, Mauro & Kinsella, Stephen & Stiglitz, Joseph E., 2016. "Agent based-stock flow consistent macroeconomics: Towards a benchmark model," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 375-408.
    2. YANO Koiti, 2009. "Dynamic Stochastic General Equilibrium Models Under a Liquidity Trap and Self-organizing State Space Modeling," ESRI Discussion paper series 206, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
    3. Viktor Winschel & Markus Krätzig, 2008. "Solving, Estimating and Selecting Nonlinear Dynamic Models without the Curse of Dimensionality," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2008-018, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
    4. Strid, Ingvar, 2008. "Metropolis-Hastings prefetching algorithms," SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 706, Stockholm School of Economics, revised 02 Dec 2009.
    5. Doh, Taeyoung, 2011. "Yield curve in an estimated nonlinear macro model," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 35(8), pages 1229-1244, August.
    6. Strid, Ingvar, 2010. "Efficient parallelisation of Metropolis-Hastings algorithms using a prefetching approach," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 54(11), pages 2814-2835, November.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Marriage; evolution; family rules; immigration; welfare policy;

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