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Pigouvian Cycles

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  • Faccini, Renato
  • Melosi, Leonardo

Abstract

Low-frequency variations in current and expected unemployment rates are important to identify TFP news shocks and to allow a general equilibrium rational expectations model to generate Pigouvian cycles: a large fraction of the comovement of output, consumption, investment, employment, and real wages is explained by changes in expectations unrelated to TFP fundamentals. The model predicts that the start (end) of most U.S. recessions is associated with agents realizing that previous enthusiastic (lukewarm) expectations about future TFP would not be met.

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  • Faccini, Renato & Melosi, Leonardo, 2018. "Pigouvian Cycles," CEPR Discussion Papers 13370, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:13370
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    JEL classification:

    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • E22 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Investment; Capital; Intangible Capital; Capacity
    • E23 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Production
    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E43 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Interest Rates: Determination, Term Structure, and Effects
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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