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School Exclusion as Social Exclusion: The Practices And Effects of Conditional Cash Transfer Programme for the Poor in Bangladesh

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  • Naomi Hossain

Abstract

This paper explores the efforts of government to interrupt the intergenerational transmission of poverty. It focuses on the practices and effects of the Primary Education Stipend Programme, a conditional cash transfer designed to attract the rural poor into school. It documents how the objects of policy – rural poor children and parents - are ‘seen’ by the state, and the sightings of the state they in turn receive. It also analyses the tools and technologies of the intervention, focusing on its targeting practices.

Suggested Citation

  • Naomi Hossain, 2009. "School Exclusion as Social Exclusion: The Practices And Effects of Conditional Cash Transfer Programme for the Poor in Bangladesh," Working Papers id:2177, eSocialSciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:2177
    Note: Institutional Papers
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Sen, Binayak, 2003. "Drivers of Escape and Descent: Changing Household Fortunes in Rural Bangladesh," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 513-534, March.
    2. Mohammad Niaz Asadullah, 2006. "Returns to Education in Bangladesh," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(4), pages 453-468.
    3. M. N. Asadullah & S. Rahman, 2009. "Farm productivity and efficiency in rural Bangladesh: the role of education revisited," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(1), pages 17-33.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bob Baulch, 2011. "The medium-term impact of the primary education stipend in rural Bangladesh," Journal of Development Effectiveness, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(2), pages 243-262.
    2. Akhter Ahmed & Mubina Khondkar & Agnes Quisumbing, 2011. "Understanding the context of institutions and policy processes for selected anti-poverty interventions in Bangladesh," Journal of Development Effectiveness, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(2), pages 175-192.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    poverty; school; Bangladesh; rural; poor children; education; education stipend; stipend; cash transfer; cash; parents; state; tools; technologies; primay education;
    All these keywords.

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