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Being, becoming and relationship: conceptual challenges of a child rights approach in development

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  • Sarah C. White

    (Department of Economics and International Development, University of Bath, Bath, UK)

Abstract

This paper considers the distinctiveness of children as development subjects and the challenges this poses to default development 'target group' approaches. It focuses on two key issues: the embeddedness of children within key relationships, and the transformative nature of age-based difference. Rather than viewing adults and children as two fixed categories, it argues that multiple relations amongst and between adults and children comprise aspects of both mutual interest and contradiction, and are always implicated in power. Offering practical tools as well as conceptual discussion to explore these, overall it advocates a person-centred, rather than category-centred, approach to both analysis and practice. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Sarah C. White, 2002. "Being, becoming and relationship: conceptual challenges of a child rights approach in development," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(8), pages 1095-1104.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:jintdv:v:14:y:2002:i:8:p:1095-1104 DOI: 10.1002/jid.950
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Sarah C. White, 2002. "From the politics of poverty to the politics of identity? Child rights and working children in Bangladesh," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(6), pages 725-735.
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    Cited by:

    1. Laura Camfield & Kaneta Choudhury & Joe Devine, 2009. "Well-being, Happiness and Why Relationships Matter: Evidence from Bangladesh," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 10(1), pages 71-91, March.
    2. K. Navaneetham & M.Kabir & C.S Krishnakumar, 2009. "Morbidity patterns in Kerala: Levels and determinants," Centre for Development Studies, Trivendrum Working Papers 411, Centre for Development Studies, Trivendrum, India.
    3. Skinner, Emily & Masuda, Jeffrey R., 2013. "Right to a healthy city? Examining the relationship between urban space and health inequity by Aboriginal youth artist-activists in Winnipeg," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, pages 210-218.
    4. Stuart C. Aitken & Thomas Herman, 2009. "Literature Review on Qualitative Methods and Standards for Engaging and Studying Independent Children in the Developing World," Papers inwopa09/63, Innocenti Working Papers.
    5. Caroline Harper, 2002. "Recent approaches to understanding policy and action for eradicating childhood poverty," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., pages 1075-1079.
    6. Khalad, M.I., 2017. "Ambiguous positionalities: Bangladeshi migrant men in The Hague," ISS Working Papers - General Series 625, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
    7. Geranda Notten & Keetie Roelen, 2010. "Cross-national comparison of monetary and multidimensional child poverty in the European Union: puzzling with the few pieces that the EUSILC provides," Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series 13510, BWPI, The University of Manchester.
    8. Nicola Jones & Andy Sumner, 2009. "Does Mixed Methods Research Matter to Understanding Childhood Well-Being?," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, pages 33-50.

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