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News about Aggregate Demand and the Business Cycle

Author

Listed:
  • Jang-Ting Guo

    (Department of Economics, University of California-Riverside)

  • Anca-Ioana Sirbu

    (Department of Economics, University of California-Riverside)

  • Mark Weder

    () (School of Economics, University of Adelaide)

Abstract

We show that a one-sector real business cycle model with variable capital utilization and mild increasing returns-to-scale is able to generate qualitatively as well as quantitatively realistic aggregate fluctuations driven by news shocks to future consumption demand. In sharp contrast to many studies in the existing expectations-driven business cycle literature, our results do not rely on non-separable preferences or investment adjustment costs.

Suggested Citation

  • Jang-Ting Guo & Anca-Ioana Sirbu & Mark Weder, 2012. "News about Aggregate Demand and the Business Cycle," School of Economics Working Papers 2012-01, University of Adelaide, School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:adl:wpaper:2012-01
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    File URL: http://www.economics.adelaide.edu.au/research/papers/doc/wp2012-01.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Paul Beaudry & Franck Portier, 2014. "News-Driven Business Cycles: Insights and Challenges," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 52(4), pages 993-1074, December.
    2. Christopher M. Gunn, 2014. "Overaccumulation, Interest, and Prices," Carleton Economic Papers 14-07, Carleton University, Department of Economics.
    3. Munechika Katayama & Kwang Hwan Kim, 2015. "Inter-sectoral Labor Immobility, Sectoral Co-movement, and News Shocks," Discussion papers e-15-011, Graduate School of Economics , Kyoto University.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    News Shocks; Aggregate Demand; Business Cycles;

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles

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