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May Rostom

Personal Details

First Name:May
Middle Name:
Last Name:Rostom
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pro988
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/research/Pages/economists/staff/may_rostom.aspx

Affiliation

(50%) Bank of England

London, United Kingdom
http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/

: +44 (0)20 3461 4878
+44 (0)20 3461 4771
Threadneedle Street, London EC2R 8AH
RePEc:edi:boegvuk (more details at EDIRC)

(50%) Department of Economics
University College London (UCL)

London, United Kingdom
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/economics/

:

Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT
RePEc:edi:deucluk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Agnes Kovacs & May Rostom & Philip Bunn, 2018. "Consumption Response to Aggregate Shocks and the Role of Leverage," Discussion Papers 1820, Centre for Macroeconomics (CFM).
  2. Franklin, Jeremy & Rostom, May & Thwaites, Gregory, 2015. "The banks that said no: banking relationships, credit supply and productivity in the United Kingdom," Bank of England working papers 557, Bank of England.
  3. Bunn, Philip & Rostom, May, 2015. "Household debt and spending in the United Kingdom," Bank of England working papers 554, Bank of England.
  4. Jeremy Franklin & May Rostom & Gregory Thwaites, 2015. "The banks that said no: banking relationships, credit supply and productivity in the UK," Discussion Papers 1525, Centre for Macroeconomics (CFM).

Articles

  1. Bunn, Philip & Rostom, May, 2014. "Household debt and spending," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 54(3), pages 304-315.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Franklin, Jeremy & Rostom, May & Thwaites, Gregory, 2015. "The banks that said no: banking relationships, credit supply and productivity in the United Kingdom," Bank of England working papers 557, Bank of England.

    Cited by:

    1. de Ridder, M., 2016. "Investment in Productivity and the Long-Run Effect of Financial Crises on Output," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1659, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    2. Francesco Manaresi & Nicola Pierri, 2018. "Credit supply and productivity growth," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1168, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    3. Clymo, AJ, 2017. "Heterogeneous Firms, Wages, and the Effects of Financial Crises," Economics Discussion Papers 20572, University of Essex, Department of Economics.
    4. Francesco Manaresi & Nicola Pierri, 2018. "Credit supply and productivity growth," BIS Working Papers 711, Bank for International Settlements.

  2. Bunn, Philip & Rostom, May, 2015. "Household debt and spending in the United Kingdom," Bank of England working papers 554, Bank of England.

    Cited by:

    1. Silvana Tenreyro & Philippe Bracke, 2017. "History Dependence in the Housing Market," 2017 Meeting Papers 423, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    2. John Simon & Tahlee Stone, 2017. "The Property Ladder after the Financial Crisis: The First Step is a Stretch but Those Who Make It Are Doing OK," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp2017-05, Reserve Bank of Australia.
    3. Aikman, David & Haldane, Andrew & Hinterschweiger, Marc & Kapadia, Sujit, 2018. "Rethinking financial stability," Bank of England working papers 712, Bank of England.
    4. Voinea, L. & Lovin, H. & Cojocaru, A., 2018. "The impact of inequality on the transmission of monetary policy," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 85(C), pages 236-250.
    5. Atif R. Mian & Amir Sufi, 2018. "Finance and Business Cycles: The Credit-Driven Household Demand Channel," NBER Working Papers 24322, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Anna Zabai, 2017. "Household debt: recent developments and challenges," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, December.
    7. Bridges, Jonathan & Jackson, Christopher & McGregor, Daisy, 2017. "Down in the slumps: the role of credit in five decades of recessions," Bank of England working papers 659, Bank of England.

  3. Jeremy Franklin & May Rostom & Gregory Thwaites, 2015. "The banks that said no: banking relationships, credit supply and productivity in the UK," Discussion Papers 1525, Centre for Macroeconomics (CFM).

    Cited by:

    1. de Ridder, M., 2016. "Investment in Productivity and the Long-Run Effect of Financial Crises on Output," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1659, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    2. Bridges, Jonathan & Jackson, Christopher & McGregor, Daisy, 2017. "Down in the slumps: the role of credit in five decades of recessions," Bank of England working papers 659, Bank of England.

Articles

  1. Bunn, Philip & Rostom, May, 2014. "Household debt and spending," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 54(3), pages 304-315.

    Cited by:

    1. Óscar Rodil-Marzábal & Vicente Menezes-Ferreira-Junior, 2016. "The Wealth Effect in the Eurozone," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, vol. 63(1), pages 87-112, March.
    2. Ashley Dunstan & Hayden Skilling, 2015. "Commercial property and financial stability," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 78, pages 1-10, March.
    3. England, David & Hebden, Andrew & Henderson, Tom & Pattie, Tom, 2015. "The Agencies and 'One Bank'," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 55(1), pages 47-55.
    4. Mian, A. & Sufi, A., 2016. "Who Bears the Cost of Recessions? The Role of House Prices and Household Debt," Handbook of Macroeconomics, Elsevier.
    5. Andersen, Asger Lau & Duus, Charlotte & Jensen, Thais Lærkholm, 2016. "Household debt and spending during the financial crisis: Evidence from Danish micro data," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 96-115.
    6. Hafizah Hammad Ahmad Khan & Hussin Abdullah & Shamzaeffa Samsudin, 2016. "The Linkages between Household Consumption and Household Debt Composition in Malaysia," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 6(4), pages 1354-1359.
    7. De Andrés Mosquera, Andrés, 2017. "Los determinantes a largo plazo y su contribución a la tasa de ahorro de los hogares españoles en el período 1985-2016 || Long-term determinants and its contribution to Spanish household saving rate d," Revista de Métodos Cuantitativos para la Economía y la Empresa = Journal of Quantitative Methods for Economics and Business Administration, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Department of Quantitative Methods for Economics and Business Administration, vol. 24(1), pages 292-339, Diciembre.
    8. Clavero, Borja, 2017. "A contribution to the Quantity Theory of Disaggregated Credit," MPRA Paper 76657, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Bunn, Philip & Rostom, May, 2015. "Household debt and spending in the United Kingdom," Bank of England working papers 554, Bank of England.
    10. Michael Thornley, 2016. "Financial stability risks from housing market cycles," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 79, pages 1-16, July.
    11. Anderson, Gareth & Bunn, Philip & Pugh, Alice & Uluc, Arzu, 2014. "The potential impact of higher interest rates on the household sector: evidence from the 2014 NMG Consulting survey," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 54(4), pages 419-433.
    12. Christophe André, 2016. "Household debt in OECD countries: stylised facts and policy issues," Chapters from NBP Conference Publications, Narodowy Bank Polski, Economic Research Department.
    13. Lars E. O. Svensson, 2016. "Amortization Requirements May Increase Household Debt; A Simple Example," IMF Working Papers 16/83, International Monetary Fund.
    14. Amaral, Pedro S., 2017. "Monetary Policy and Inequality," Economic Commentary, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, issue January.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 3 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-BAN: Banking (2) 2015-10-17 2015-10-25. Author is listed
  2. NEP-EFF: Efficiency & Productivity (2) 2015-10-25 2015-10-25. Author is listed
  3. NEP-BEC: Business Economics (1) 2015-10-25. Author is listed
  4. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (1) 2015-10-17. Author is listed

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