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May Rostom

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First Name:May
Middle Name:
Last Name:Rostom
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RePEc Short-ID:pro988
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
https://www.sites.google.com/site/mrostom/home

Affiliation

Bank of England

London, United Kingdom
http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/

+44 (0)20 3461 4878
+44 (0)20 3461 4771
Threadneedle Street, London EC2R 8AH
RePEc:edi:boegvuk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Agnes Kovacs & May Rostom & Philip Bunn, 2018. "Consumption Response to Aggregate Shocks and the Role of Leverage," Discussion Papers 1820, Centre for Macroeconomics (CFM).
  2. Coen, Jamie & Francis, William & Rostom, May, 2017. "The determinants of UK credit union failure," Bank of England working papers 658, Bank of England.
  3. Franklin, Jeremy & Rostom, May & Thwaites, Gregory, 2015. "The banks that said no: banking relationships, credit supply and productivity in the United Kingdom," Bank of England working papers 557, Bank of England.
  4. Bunn, Philip & Rostom, May, 2015. "Household debt and spending in the United Kingdom," Bank of England working papers 554, Bank of England.
  5. Jeremy Franklin & May Rostom & Gregory Thwaites, 2015. "The banks that said no: banking relationships, credit supply and productivity in the UK," Discussion Papers 1525, Centre for Macroeconomics (CFM).

Articles

  1. Bunn, Philip & Rostom, May, 2014. "Household debt and spending," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 54(3), pages 304-315.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Agnes Kovacs & May Rostom & Philip Bunn, 2018. "Consumption Response to Aggregate Shocks and the Role of Leverage," Discussion Papers 1820, Centre for Macroeconomics (CFM).

    Cited by:

    1. Nakajima, Jouchi, 2020. "The role of household debt heterogeneity on consumption: Evidence from Japanese household data," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 186-197.

  2. Franklin, Jeremy & Rostom, May & Thwaites, Gregory, 2015. "The banks that said no: banking relationships, credit supply and productivity in the United Kingdom," Bank of England working papers 557, Bank of England.

    Cited by:

    1. de Ridder, M., 2016. "Investment in Productivity and the Long-Run Effect of Financial Crises on Output," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1659, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    2. Degryse, Hans & Matthews, Kent & Zhao, Tianshu, 2018. "SMEs and access to bank credit: Evidence on the regional propagation of the financial crisis in the UK," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 53-70.
    3. Millard, Stephen & Nicolae, Anamaria & Nower, Michael, 2019. "International trade, non-trading firms and their impact on labour productivity," Bank of England working papers 787, Bank of England.
    4. Lychakov, Nikita, 2019. "From financial crisis to revolution: Russia 1899-1905," MPRA Paper 95166, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Anderson, Gareth & Riley, Rebecca & Young, Garry, 2019. "Distressed banks, distorted decisions?," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 100947, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    6. Timothy J. Besley & Isabelle A. Roland & John Van Reenen, 2020. "The Aggregate Consequences of Default Risk: Evidence from Firm-level Data," NBER Working Papers 26686, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Berger, Allen N. & Molyneux, Phil & Wilson, John O.S., 2020. "Banks and the real economy: An assessment of the research," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 62(C).
    8. Doerr, Sebastian & Raissi, Mehdi & Weber, Anke, 2018. "Credit-supply shocks and firm productivity in Italy," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 155-171.
    9. Driver, Ciaran & Muñoz-Bugarin, Jair, 2019. "Financial constraints on investment: Effects of firm size and the financial crisis," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 441-457.
    10. Richard Disney & Helen Miller & Thomas Pope, 2018. "Firm-level investment spikes and aggregate investment over the Great Recession," IFS Working Papers W18/03, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    11. Francesco Manaresi & Nicola Pierri, 2018. "Credit supply and productivity growth," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1168, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    12. Spatareanu, Mariana & Manole, Vlad & Kabiri, Ali, 2019. "Do bank liquidity shocks hamper firms’ innovation?," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 67(C).
    13. Clymo, AJ, 2017. "Heterogeneous Firms, Wages, and the Effects of Financial Crises," Economics Discussion Papers 20572, University of Essex, Department of Economics.
    14. Francesco Manaresi & Nicola Pierri, 2019. "Credit Supply and Productivity Growth," IMF Working Papers 19/107, International Monetary Fund.
    15. Francesco Manaresi & Nicola Pierri, 2018. "Credit supply and productivity growth," BIS Working Papers 711, Bank for International Settlements.
    16. Michal Brzozowski, 2019. "Access to Credit and Growth of Firms," Czech Journal of Economics and Finance (Finance a uver), Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, vol. 69(3), pages 253-274, June.

  3. Bunn, Philip & Rostom, May, 2015. "Household debt and spending in the United Kingdom," Bank of England working papers 554, Bank of England.

    Cited by:

    1. Bracke, Philippe & Tenreyro, Silvana, 2020. "History dependence in the housing market," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 103079, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Rutger Teulings & Bram Wouterse & Kan Ji, 2019. "Disentangling the effect of household debt on consumption," CPB Discussion Paper 395.rdf, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    3. David Aikman & Jonathan Bridges & Anil Kashyap & Caspar Siegert, 2019. "Would Macroprudential Regulation Have Prevented the Last Crisis?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 33(1), pages 107-130, Winter.
    4. John Simon & Tahlee Stone, 2017. "The Property Ladder after the Financial Crisis: The First Step is a Stretch but Those Who Make It Are Doing OK," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp2017-05, Reserve Bank of Australia.
    5. Aikman, David & Haldane, Andrew & Hinterschweiger, Marc & Kapadia, Sujit, 2018. "Rethinking financial stability," Bank of England working papers 712, Bank of England.
    6. Atif Mian & Amir Sufi, 2018. "Finance and Business Cycles: The Credit-Driven Household Demand Channel," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 32(3), pages 31-58, Summer.
    7. Cumming, Fergus, 2018. "Mortgages, cash-flow shocks and local employment," Bank of England working papers 773, Bank of England.
    8. Voinea, L. & Lovin, H. & Cojocaru, A., 2018. "The impact of inequality on the transmission of monetary policy," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 85(C), pages 236-250.
    9. Fiona Price & Benjamin Beckers & Gianni La Cava, 2019. "The Effect of Mortgage Debt on Consumer Spending: Evidence from Household-level Data," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp2019-06, Reserve Bank of Australia.
    10. Anna Zabai, 2017. "Household debt: recent developments and challenges," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, December.
    11. Bridges, Jonathan & Jackson, Christopher & McGregor, Daisy, 2017. "Down in the slumps: the role of credit in five decades of recessions," Bank of England working papers 659, Bank of England.
    12. Mcknight, Abigail, 2019. "Understanding the relationship between poverty, inequality and growth: a review of existing evidence," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 103458, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    13. Abigail McKnight, 2019. "Understanding the relationship between poverty, inequality and growth: a review of existing evidence," CASE Papers /216, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE.

  4. Jeremy Franklin & May Rostom & Gregory Thwaites, 2015. "The banks that said no: banking relationships, credit supply and productivity in the UK," Discussion Papers 1525, Centre for Macroeconomics (CFM).

    Cited by:

    1. de Ridder, M., 2016. "Investment in Productivity and the Long-Run Effect of Financial Crises on Output," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1659, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    2. Aikman, David & Giese, Julia & Kapadia, Sujit & McLeay, Michael, 2019. "Targeting financial stability: macroprudential or monetary policy?," Working Paper Series 2278, European Central Bank.
    3. Berger, Allen N. & Molyneux, Phil & Wilson, John O.S., 2020. "Banks and the real economy: An assessment of the research," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 62(C).
    4. Driver, Ciaran & Muñoz-Bugarin, Jair, 2019. "Financial constraints on investment: Effects of firm size and the financial crisis," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 441-457.
    5. Richard Disney & Helen Miller & Thomas Pope, 2018. "Firm-level investment spikes and aggregate investment over the Great Recession," IFS Working Papers W18/03, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    6. Spatareanu, Mariana & Manole, Vlad & Kabiri, Ali, 2019. "Do bank liquidity shocks hamper firms’ innovation?," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 67(C).
    7. Bridges, Jonathan & Jackson, Christopher & McGregor, Daisy, 2017. "Down in the slumps: the role of credit in five decades of recessions," Bank of England working papers 659, Bank of England.

Articles

  1. Bunn, Philip & Rostom, May, 2014. "Household debt and spending," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 54(3), pages 304-315.

    Cited by:

    1. Mairead de Roiste & Apostolos Fasianos & Robert Kirkby & Fang Yao, 2019. "Household Leverage and Asymmetric Housing Wealth Effects- Evidence from New Zealand," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Discussion Paper Series DP2019/01, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
    2. Óscar Rodil-Marzábal & Vicente Menezes-Ferreira-Junior, 2016. "The Wealth Effect in the Eurozone," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, vol. 63(1), pages 87-112, March.
    3. Ashley Dunstan & Hayden Skilling, 2015. "Commercial property and financial stability," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 78, pages 1-10, March.
    4. Agnes Kovacs & May Rostom & Philip Bunn, 2018. "Consumption Response to Aggregate Shocks and the Role of Leverage," Discussion Papers 1820, Centre for Macroeconomics (CFM).
    5. Gianni La Cava & Helen Hughson & Greg Kaplan, 2016. "The Household Cash Flow Channel of Monetary Policy," RBA Research Discussion Papers rdp2016-12, Reserve Bank of Australia.
    6. England, David & Hebden, Andrew & Henderson, Tom & Pattie, Tom, 2015. "The Agencies and 'One Bank'," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 55(1), pages 47-55.
    7. Andersen, Asger Lau & Duus, Charlotte & Jensen, Thais Lærkholm, 2016. "Household debt and spending during the financial crisis: Evidence from Danish micro data," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 96-115.
    8. De Andrés Mosquera, Andrés, 2017. "Los determinantes a largo plazo y su contribución a la tasa de ahorro de los hogares españoles en el período 1985-2016 || Long-term determinants and its contribution to Spanish household saving rate d," Revista de Métodos Cuantitativos para la Economía y la Empresa = Journal of Quantitative Methods for Economics and Business Administration, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Department of Quantitative Methods for Economics and Business Administration, vol. 24(1), pages 292-339, Diciembre.
    9. Clavero, Borja, 2017. "A contribution to the Quantity Theory of Disaggregated Credit," MPRA Paper 76657, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Atif Mian & Amir Sufi, 2016. "Who Bears the Cost of Recessions? The Role of House Prices and Household Debt," NBER Working Papers 22256, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Michael Thornley, 2016. "Financial stability risks from housing market cycles," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Bulletin, Reserve Bank of New Zealand, vol. 79, pages 1-16, July.
    12. Anderson, Gareth & Bunn, Philip & Pugh, Alice & Uluc, Arzu, 2014. "The potential impact of higher interest rates on the household sector: evidence from the 2014 NMG Consulting survey," Bank of England Quarterly Bulletin, Bank of England, vol. 54(4), pages 419-433.
    13. Patience Nkala & Asrat Tsegaye, 2017. "The Relationship between Household Debt and Consumption Spending in South Africa," Journal of Economics and Behavioral Studies, AMH International, vol. 9(2), pages 243-257.
    14. Christophe André, 2016. "Household debt in OECD countries: Stylised facts and policy issues," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1277, OECD Publishing.
    15. Fernando Alexandre & Hélder Costa & Miguel Portela & Miguel Rodrigues, 2018. "Asymmetric regional dynamics: from bust to recovery," NIPE Working Papers 17/2018, NIPE - Universidade do Minho.
    16. Le Blanc, Julia & Lydon, Reamonn, 2020. "Indebtedness and spending: what happens when the music stops?," Working Paper Series 2389, European Central Bank.
    17. Konstantina Manou & Panagiotis Palaios & Evangelia Papapetrou, 2019. "Housing wealth, household debt and financial assets: are there implications for consumption?," Working Papers 263, Bank of Greece.
    18. Michiel Bijlsma & Remco Mocking, 2017. "The Impact of House Price Shocks on the Savings of Dutch Homeowners and Renters," CPB Discussion Paper 346.rdf, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    19. Hafizah Hammad Ahmad Khan & Hussin Abdullah & Shamzaeffa Samsudin, 2016. "The Linkages between Household Consumption and Household Debt Composition in Malaysia," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 6(4), pages 1354-1359.
    20. Bunn, Philip & Rostom, May, 2015. "Household debt and spending in the United Kingdom," Bank of England working papers 554, Bank of England.
    21. Pedro S. Amaral, 2017. "Monetary Policy and Inequality," Economic Commentary, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, issue January.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 6 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-BAN: Banking (3) 2015-10-17 2015-10-25 2017-04-30. Author is listed
  2. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (3) 2015-10-17 2018-07-23 2018-11-05. Author is listed
  3. NEP-EFF: Efficiency & Productivity (2) 2015-10-25 2015-10-25. Author is listed
  4. NEP-BEC: Business Economics (1) 2015-10-25
  5. NEP-DCM: Discrete Choice Models (1) 2017-04-30

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