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Credit-supply shocks and firm productivity in Italy

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  • Doerr, Sebastian
  • Raissi, Mehdi
  • Weber, Anke

Abstract

The Italian economy has been struggling with low productivity growth and bank balance sheet strains. This paper examines the implications for firm productivity of adverse shocks to bank lending in Italy, using a novel identification scheme and loan-level data on syndicated lending. We exploit the heterogeneous loan exposure of Italian banks to foreign borrowers in distress, and find that a negative shock to bank credit supply reduces firms’ loan growth, investment, capital-to-labor ratio, and productivity. The transmission from changes in credit supply to firm productivity relates to labor market rigidities, which delay or distort the adjustment of firms’ desired labor and capital allocations, and thereby reduce firms’ productivity. Effects are stronger for firms with higher capital intensity and external financial dependence.

Suggested Citation

  • Doerr, Sebastian & Raissi, Mehdi & Weber, Anke, 2018. "Credit-supply shocks and firm productivity in Italy," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 155-171.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jimfin:v:87:y:2018:i:c:p:155-171
    DOI: 10.1016/j.jimonfin.2018.06.004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Harald Hau & Difei Ouyang, 2019. "Local Capital Scarcity and Small Firm Growth: Evidence from Real Estate Booms in China," CESifo Working Paper Series 7928, CESifo.
    2. Bezemer, Dirk & Samarina, Anna & Zhang, Lu, 2020. "Does mortgage lending impact business credit? Evidence from a new disaggregated bank credit data set," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 113(C).
    3. Bryan Harcy & Can Sever, 2020. "Financial Crises and Innovation," BIS Working Papers 846, Bank for International Settlements.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Italy; Credit-supply shocks; Productivity; Labor market rigidities;

    JEL classification:

    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages

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