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Credit Constraints and Firm Productivity: Evidence from Italy

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  • Francesco Manaresi

    (Bank of Italy, Structural Economic Department)

  • Nicola Pierri

    (Stanford University)

Abstract

This paper studies the impact of credit constraints on manufacturers' production. We exploit a matched firm-bank panel data covering all Italian companies over the period 1998-2012 to derive a measure of supply-side shock to rm speci c credit constraints, and study how it affects input accumulation and value added productivity. We show that an expansion in the credit supply faced by a firm increases both input accumulation (size effect) and its ability to generate value added for a given level of inputs (productivity effect). Results are robust to various productivity estimation techniques, and to an alternative measure of credit supply shock that uses the 2007-2008 interbank market freeze to control for assortative matching between firms and banks. We discuss different potential channels for the estimated e ect and explore their empirical implications.

Suggested Citation

  • Francesco Manaresi & Nicola Pierri, 2017. "Credit Constraints and Firm Productivity: Evidence from Italy," Mo.Fi.R. Working Papers 137, Money and Finance Research group (Mo.Fi.R.) - Univ. Politecnica Marche - Dept. Economic and Social Sciences.
  • Handle: RePEc:anc:wmofir:137
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    10. Federico Cingano & Francesco Manaresi & Enrico Sette, 2016. "Does Credit Crunch Investment Down? New Evidence on the Real Effects of the Bank-Lending Channel," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 29(10), pages 2737-2773.
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    1. Se restano a corto di liquidità le imprese produttive
      by Tortuga in La Voce on 2020-05-25 10:59:46

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    2. Philippe Aghion & Antonin Bergeaud & Gilbert Cette & Rémy Lecat & Hélène Maghin, 2018. "The inverted-U relationship between credit access and productivity growth," CEP Discussion Papers dp1588, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    3. Daniela Marconi & Christian Upper, 2017. "Capital misallocation and financial development: A sector-level analysis," BIS Working Papers 671, Bank for International Settlements.
    4. Antonin Bergeaud & Gilbert Cette & Rémy Lecat, 2019. "The Circular Relationship Between Productivity Growth and Real Interest Rates," Working papers 734, Banque de France.
    5. Ferrando, Annalisa & Rossi, Stefania P. S. & Bonanno, Graziella, 2020. "Determinants of firms’ efficiency: do innovations and finance constraints matter? The case of European SMEs," Working Paper Series 2419, European Central Bank.

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