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Erik Mohlin

Personal Details

First Name:Erik
Middle Name:
Last Name:Mohlin
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pmo564
https://sites.google.com/site/karlerikmohlin/
Terminal Degree:2010 Department of Economics; Handelshögskolan i Stockholm (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Nationalekonomiska Institutionen
Ekonomihögskolan
Lunds Universitet

Lund, Sweden
http://www.nek.lu.se/

: +46 +46 222 0000
+46 +46 2224613
P.O. Box 7082, S-222 07 LUND
RePEc:edi:delunse (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Heller, Yuval & Mohlin, Erik, 2015. "Unique Stationary Behavior," MPRA Paper 66179, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Heller, Yuval & Mohlin, Erik, 2015. "Stable Observable Behavior," MPRA Paper 63013, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  3. Heller, Yuval & Mohlin, Erik, 2014. "Coevolution of Deception and Preferences: Darwin and Nash Meet Machiavelli," MPRA Paper 58255, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. Erik Mohlin & Robert Ostling & Joseph Tao-yi Wang, 2014. "Learning by Imitation in Games: Theory, Field, and Laboratory," Economics Series Working Papers 734, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  5. Mohlin, Erik, 2010. "Evolution of Theories of Mind," SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 0728, Stockholm School of Economics, revised 20 Mar 2012.
  6. Mohlin, Erik, 2009. "Optimal Categorization," SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 721, Stockholm School of Economics, revised 30 May 2014.

Articles

  1. Mohlin, Erik & Östling, Robert & Wang, Joseph Tao-yi, 2015. "Lowest unique bid auctions with population uncertainty," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 134(C), pages 53-57.
  2. Mohlin, Erik, 2014. "Optimal categorization," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 152(C), pages 356-381.
  3. Mohlin, Erik, 2012. "Evolution of theories of mind," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 75(1), pages 299-318.
  4. Erik Mohlin, 2010. "Internalized social norms in conflicts: an evolutionary approach," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 11(2), pages 169-181, April.
  5. Mohlin, Erik & Johannesson, Magnus, 2008. "Communication: Content or relationship?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 65(3-4), pages 409-419, March.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Heller, Yuval & Mohlin, Erik, 2014. "Coevolution of Deception and Preferences: Darwin and Nash Meet Machiavelli," MPRA Paper 58255, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Pardo, Oliver, 2017. "A note on “Evolution of Preferences”," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 129-134.
    2. Heller, Yuval & Mohlin, Erik, 2015. "Stable Observable Behavior," MPRA Paper 63013, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Florian Gauer & Christoph Kuzmics, 2016. "Cognitive Empathy in Conflict Situations," Graz Economics Papers 2016-02, University of Graz, Department of Economics.

  2. Erik Mohlin & Robert Ostling & Joseph Tao-yi Wang, 2014. "Learning by Imitation in Games: Theory, Field, and Laboratory," Economics Series Working Papers 734, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Takashi Yamada & Nobuyuki Hanaki, 2016. "An Experiment on Lowest Unique Integer Games," Post-Print halshs-01204814, HAL.
    2. Mohlin, Erik & Östling, Robert & Wang, Joseph Tao-yi, 2015. "Lowest unique bid auctions with population uncertainty," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 134(C), pages 53-57.
    3. Takashi Yamada & Nobuyuki Hanaki, 2015. "An Experiment on Lowest Unique Integer Games," GREDEG Working Papers 2015-34, Groupe de REcherche en Droit, Economie, Gestion (GREDEG CNRS), University of Nice Sophia Antipolis.

  3. Mohlin, Erik, 2010. "Evolution of Theories of Mind," SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 0728, Stockholm School of Economics, revised 20 Mar 2012.

    Cited by:

    1. Heller, Yuval, 2012. "Three steps ahead," MPRA Paper 39429, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Kimbrough, Erik O. & Robalino, Nikolaus & Robson, Arthur J., 2017. "Applying “theory of mind”: Theory and experiments," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 209-226.
    3. Erik O. Kimbrough & Nikolaus Robalino & Arthur J. Robson, 2013. "The Evolution of 'Theory of Mind': Theory and Experiments," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1908R, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University, revised Jan 2014.
    4. Khan Abhimanyu & Peeters Ronald, 2012. "Cognitive hierarchies in adaptive play," Research Memorandum 007, Maastricht University, Maastricht Research School of Economics of Technology and Organization (METEOR).
    5. Sandholm, William H., 2015. "Population Games and Deterministic Evolutionary Dynamics," Handbook of Game Theory with Economic Applications, Elsevier.
    6. Rtischev, Dimitry, 2012. "Evolution of mindsight, transparency and rule-rationality," MPRA Paper 40890, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Sheen S. Levine & Mark Bernard & Rosemarie Nagel, 2017. "Strategic Intelligence: The Cognitive Capability to Anticipate Competitor Behavior," Strategic Management Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 38(12), pages 2390-2423, December.

  4. Mohlin, Erik, 2009. "Optimal Categorization," SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 721, Stockholm School of Economics, revised 30 May 2014.

    Cited by:

    1. Natalia Shestakova, 2010. "Pricing Scheme Choice: How Process Affects Outcome," CERGE-EI Working Papers wp411, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economics Institute, Prague.
    2. Miettinen, Topi, 2009. "Paying Attention to Payoffs in Analogy-Based Learning," SITE Working Paper Series 7, Stockholm School of Economics, Stockholm Institute of Transition Economics.
    3. Ennio Bilancini & Leonardo Boncinelli, 2014. "Persuasion with Reference Cues and Elaboration Costs," Working Papers - Economics wp2014_04.rdf, Universita' degli Studi di Firenze, Dipartimento di Scienze per l'Economia e l'Impresa.
    4. Heller, Yuval & Winter, Eyal, 2013. "Rule Rationality," MPRA Paper 48746, University Library of Munich, Germany.
      • Yuval Heller & Eyal Winter, 2016. "Rule Rationality," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 57, pages 997-1026, August.
    5. Mengel, Friederike & Sciubba, Emanuela, 2014. "Extrapolation and structural similarity in games," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 125(3), pages 381-385.
    6. Chollete, Loran & Schmeidler, David, 2014. "Demand-Theoretic Approach to Choice of Priors," UiS Working Papers in Economics and Finance 2014/14, University of Stavanger.
    7. Bleile, Jörg, 2016. "Categorization based Belief formations," Center for Mathematical Economics Working Papers 519, Center for Mathematical Economics, Bielefeld University.
    8. Vessela Daskalova & Nicolaas J. Vriend, 2014. "Categorization and Coordination," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1460, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    9. Bilancini, Ennio & Boncinelli, Leonardo, 2018. "Rational attitude change by reference cues when information elaboration requires effort," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 90-107.

Articles

  1. Mohlin, Erik & Östling, Robert & Wang, Joseph Tao-yi, 2015. "Lowest unique bid auctions with population uncertainty," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 134(C), pages 53-57.

    Cited by:

    1. Nava Kahana & Doron Klunover, 2015. "A note on Poisson contests," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 165(1), pages 97-102, October.
    2. Drugov, Mikhail & Ryvkin, Dmitry, 2017. "Winner-Take-All Tournaments," CEPR Discussion Papers 12067, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Luke Boosey & Philip Brookins & Dmitry Ryvkin, 2016. "Contests with group size uncertainty: Experimental evidence," Working Papers wp2016_07_01, Department of Economics, Florida State University.
    4. Luke Boosey & Philip Brookins & Dmitry Ryvkin, 2017. "Contests between groups of unknown size," Working Papers wp2017_03_01, Department of Economics, Florida State University.
    5. Takashi Yamada & Nobuyuki Hanaki, 2015. "An Experiment on Lowest Unique Integer Games," GREDEG Working Papers 2015-34, Groupe de REcherche en Droit, Economie, Gestion (GREDEG CNRS), University of Nice Sophia Antipolis.
    6. Dmitry Ryvkin & Mikhail Drugov, 2017. "Tournaments," Working Papers wp2017_03_02, Department of Economics, Florida State University.
    7. Erik Mohlin & Robert Ostling & Joseph Tao-yi Wang, 2014. "Learning by Imitation in Games: Theory, Field, and Laboratory," Economics Series Working Papers 734, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.

  2. Mohlin, Erik, 2014. "Optimal categorization," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 152(C), pages 356-381.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Mohlin, Erik, 2012. "Evolution of theories of mind," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 75(1), pages 299-318.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Erik Mohlin, 2010. "Internalized social norms in conflicts: an evolutionary approach," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 11(2), pages 169-181, April.

    Cited by:

    1. Boudreau, James W. & Shunda, Nicholas, 2010. "On the evolution of prize perceptions in contests," MPRA Paper 24640, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Ansink, Erik, 2011. "The Arctic scramble: Introducing claims in a contest model," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 693-707.
    3. Heller, Yuval & Mohlin, Erik, 2014. "Coevolution of Deception and Preferences: Darwin and Nash Meet Machiavelli," MPRA Paper 58255, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Lukasz Kutylo, 2017. "In Search of the ‘Spirit of Capitalism’: About Normative Mechanisms Responsible for the Organisation of Social Behaviours," Annales. Ethics in Economic Life, University of Lodz, Faculty of Economics and Sociology, vol. 20(4), pages 77-87, December.

  5. Mohlin, Erik & Johannesson, Magnus, 2008. "Communication: Content or relationship?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 65(3-4), pages 409-419, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Brandes, Leif & Darai, Donja, 2017. "The value and motivating mechanism of transparency in organizations," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 189-198.
    2. Marco Kleine & Pascal Langenbach & Lilia Zhurakhovska, 2014. "Fairness and Persuasion. How Stakeholder Communication Affects Impartial Decision Making," Discussion Paper Series of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods 2014_03, Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods.
    3. Dreber, Anna & Ellingsen, Tore & Johannesson, Magnus & Rand, David, 2011. "Do People Care about Social Context? Framing Effects in Dictator Games," SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 738, Stockholm School of Economics.
    4. Koukoumelis, Anastasios & Levati, M. Vittoria & Weisser, Johannes, 2012. "Leading by words: A voluntary contribution experiment with one-way communication," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 81(2), pages 379-390.
    5. Bruttel, Lisa & Stolley, Florian & Utikal, Verena, 2017. "Getting a Yes. An Experiment on the Power of Asking," MPRA Paper 79140, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Agnès Festré & Pierre Garrouste, 2012. "Somebody May Scold You! A Dictator Experiment," GREDEG Working Papers 2012-04, Groupe de REcherche en Droit, Economie, Gestion (GREDEG CNRS), University of Nice Sophia Antipolis.
    7. Christoph Vanberg, 2007. "Voting on a sharing norm in a dictator game," Jena Economic Research Papers 2007-036, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
    8. Kleine, Marco & Langenbach, Pascal & Zhurakhovska, Lilia, 2016. "Fairness and persuasion," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 141(C), pages 173-176.
    9. Andersson, Ola & Wengström, Erik, 2011. "Credible Communication and Cooperation: Experimental Evidence from Multi-stage Games," Working Paper Series 883, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
    10. Samahita, Margaret, 2017. "Venting and gossiping in conflicts: Verbal expression in ultimatum games," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 111-121.
    11. James Andreoni & Justin M. Rao, 2010. "The Power of Asking: How Communication Affects Selfishness, Empathy, and Altruism," NBER Working Papers 16373, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Leif Brandes & Donja Darai, 2014. "The value of top-down communication for organizational performance," ECON - Working Papers 157, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.
    13. Roi Zultan, 2011. "Strategic And Social Preplay Communication In The Ultimatum Game," Working Papers 1107, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Department of Economics.
    14. Brock, J. Michelle & Lange, Andreas & Leonard, Kenneth L., 2015. "Esteem and social information: On determinants of prosocial behavior of clinicians in Tanzania," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 118(C), pages 85-94.
    15. Schütte, Miriam & Thoma, Carmen, 2014. "Promises and Image Concerns," Discussion Papers in Economics 20861, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    16. Gary Bolton & Peter Werner, 2016. "The influence of potential on wages and effort," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 19(3), pages 535-561, September.
    17. Kleine, Marco & Langenbach, Pascal & Zhurakhovska, Lilia, 2017. "How voice shapes reactions to impartial decision-makers: An experiment on participation procedures," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 143(C), pages 241-253.
    18. Marco Kleine & Pascal Langenbach & Lilia Zhurakhovska, 2013. "How Voice Shapes Reactions to Impartial Decision- Makers: An Experiment on Participation Procedures," Discussion Paper Series of the Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods 2013_11, Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods, revised Feb 2017.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 5 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-GTH: Game Theory (5) 2009-06-10 2014-11-17 2015-01-09 2015-03-27 2015-09-05. Author is listed
  2. NEP-CBE: Cognitive & Behavioural Economics (4) 2009-06-10 2010-05-15 2015-01-09 2015-03-27
  3. NEP-EVO: Evolutionary Economics (3) 2010-05-15 2014-11-17 2015-03-27
  4. NEP-HPE: History & Philosophy of Economics (3) 2014-11-17 2015-03-27 2015-09-05
  5. NEP-MIC: Microeconomics (3) 2014-11-17 2015-03-27 2015-09-05
  6. NEP-NEU: Neuroeconomics (1) 2010-05-15

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