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Fairness and persuasion

Listed author(s):
  • Kleine, Marco
  • Langenbach, Pascal
  • Zhurakhovska, Lilia
Registered author(s):

    We study experimentally to what extent distributive fairness decisions by impartial authorities are influenced by stakeholders’ fairness opinions. In a three-player allocation game, we compare Communication treatments, in which one of the stakeholders states her opinion prior to the allocation decision, to a Baseline without communication. We find that stakeholders who state their opinion are allocated significantly less money than their counterparts in the Baseline. Asymmetric reactions to the statements appear to be the driving force behind this result: Authorities deviate from their initial fairness judgment and follow stakeholders’ opinions if the requests are moderate; they largely ignore high monetary requests.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0165176516300489
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Economics Letters.

    Volume (Year): 141 (2016)
    Issue (Month): C ()
    Pages: 173-176

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:141:y:2016:i:c:p:173-176
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econlet.2016.02.019
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolet

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    1. Dirk Engelmann & Martin Strobel, 2004. "Inequality Aversion, Efficiency, and Maximin Preferences in Simple Distribution Experiments," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(4), pages 857-869, September.
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    7. Mohlin, Erik & Johannesson, Magnus, 2008. "Communication: Content or relationship?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 65(3-4), pages 409-419, March.
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    9. Andreoni, James & Rao, Justin M., 2011. "The power of asking: How communication affects selfishness, empathy, and altruism," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(7), pages 513-520.
    10. Nikiforakis, Nikos & Noussair, Charles N. & Wilkening, Tom, 2012. "Normative conflict and feuds: The limits of self-enforcement," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(9-10), pages 797-807.
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