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Inequality Aversion, Efficiency, and Maximin Preferences in Simple Distribution Experiments

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  • Dirk Engelmann
  • Martin Strobel

Abstract

We present simple one-shot distribution experiments comparing the relative importance of efficiency concerns, maximin preferences, and inequality aversion, as well as the relative performance of the fairness theories by Gary E Bolton and Axel Ockenfels and by Ernst Fehr and Klaus M. Schmidt. While the Fehr-Schmidt theory performs better in a direct comparison, this appears to be due to being in line with maximin preferences. More importantly, we find that a combination of efficiency concerns, maximin preferences, and selfishness can rationalize most of the data while the Bolton-Ockenfels and Fehr-Schmidt theories are unable to explain important patterns.

Suggested Citation

  • Dirk Engelmann & Martin Strobel, 2004. "Inequality Aversion, Efficiency, and Maximin Preferences in Simple Distribution Experiments," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(4), pages 857-869, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:94:y:2004:i:4:p:857-869
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/0002828042002741
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    References listed on IDEAS

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