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Fairness views and political preferences: evidence from a large and heterogeneous sample

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  • Daniel Müller

    (LMU Munich, Center for Economic Studies (CES))

  • Sander Renes

    (Erasmus School of Economics)

Abstract

We elicit distributional fairness ideals of impartial spectators using an incentivized experiment in a large and heterogeneous sample of the German population. We document several empirical facts: (i) egalitarianism is more popular than efficiency- and maxi-min ideals; (ii) females are more egalitarian than men; (iii) men are relatively more efficiency minded; (iv) left-leaning voters are more likely to be egalitarians, whereas right-leaning voters are more likely to be efficiency-minded; and (v) young and high-educated participants hold different fairness ideals than the rest of the population. Moreover, we show that fairness ideals predict preferences for redistribution and intervention by the government, as well as actual charitable giving, even after controlling for a range of covariates. This paper thus contributes to our understanding of the underpinnings of voting behavior and ideological preferences and to the literature that links laboratory measures and field behavior.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel Müller & Sander Renes, 2021. "Fairness views and political preferences: evidence from a large and heterogeneous sample," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 56(4), pages 679-711, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:sochwe:v:56:y:2021:i:4:d:10.1007_s00355-020-01289-5
    DOI: 10.1007/s00355-020-01289-5
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    3. Michael Kurschilgen, 2021. "Moral awareness polarizes people's fairness judgments," Munich Papers in Political Economy 17, Munich School of Politics and Public Policy and the TUM School of Management at the Technical University of Munich.
    4. Antinyan, Armenak & Baghdasaryan, Vardan & Grigoryan, Aleksandr, 2021. "Charitable giving, social capital and positional concerns," Cardiff Economics Working Papers E2021/33, Cardiff University, Cardiff Business School, Economics Section.
    5. Camille Dorin & Marine Hainguerlot & Hélène Huber-Yahi & Jean-Christophe Vergnaud & Vincent de Gardelle, 2021. "How economic success shapes redistribution: The role of self-serving beliefs, in-group bias and justice principles," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 16(4), pages 932-949, July.
    6. Blesse, Sebastian, 2021. "Are your tax problems an opportunity not to pay taxes? Evidence from a randomized survey experiment," ZEW Discussion Papers 21-040, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.

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