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Chang Ma

Personal Details

First Name:Chang
Middle Name:
Last Name:Ma
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pma2557
http://machang.weebly.com
Room 514, No.5 Building, 220 Handan Rd., Yangpu District, Shanghai 200433
Terminal Degree:2018 Department of Economics; Johns Hopkins University (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Fanhai International School of Finance
Fudan University

Shanghai, China
http://fisf.fudan.edu.cn/
RePEc:edi:sffudcn (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Chang Ma & Shang-Jin Wei, 2020. "International Equity and Debt Flows: Composition, Crisis, and Controls," NBER Working Papers 27129, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Ma, Chang & Rogers, John & Zhou, Sili, 2020. "The effect of the China Connect," BOFIT Discussion Papers 1/2020, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
  3. Chang Ma & John H. Rogers & Sili Zhou, 2020. "Modern Pandemics: Recession and Recovery," International Finance Discussion Papers 1295, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  4. Bednarek, Peter & te Kaat, Daniel Marcel & Ma, Chang & Rebucci, Alessandro, 2019. "Capital flows, real estate, and local cycles: Evidence from German cities, banks, and firms," Discussion Papers 45/2019, Deutsche Bundesbank.
  5. Alessandro Rebucci & Chang Ma, 2019. "Capital Controls: A Survey of the New Literature," NBER Working Papers 26558, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Chang Ma, 2018. "Financial Stability, Growth, and Macroprudential Policy," 2018 Meeting Papers 3, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  7. Mr. Fabian Valencia & Chang Ma, 2018. "Welfare Gains from Market Insurance: The Case of Mexican Oil Price Risk," IMF Working Papers 2018/035, International Monetary Fund.

Articles

  1. Ma, Chang & Nguyen, Xuan-Hai, 2021. "Too big to fail and optimal regulation," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 747-758.
  2. Chang Ma, 2020. "Self-regulation versus government regulation: an externality view," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 58(2), pages 166-183, December.
  3. Ma, Chang, 2020. "Financial stability, growth and macroprudential policy," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 122(C).

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

RePEc Biblio mentions

As found on the RePEc Biblio, the curated bibliography of Economics:
  1. Ma, Chang & Rogers, John & Zhou, Sili, 2020. "Modern pandemics : Recession and recovery," BOFIT Discussion Papers 16/2020, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.

    Mentioned in:

    1. > Economics of Welfare > Health Economics > Economics of Pandemics > Consequences > Macroeconomic

Working papers

  1. Chang Ma & Shang-Jin Wei, 2020. "International Equity and Debt Flows: Composition, Crisis, and Controls," NBER Working Papers 27129, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Chang Ma, 2020. "Self-regulation versus government regulation: an externality view," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 58(2), pages 166-183, December.

  2. Ma, Chang & Rogers, John & Zhou, Sili, 2020. "The effect of the China Connect," BOFIT Discussion Papers 1/2020, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.

    Cited by:

    1. Johannes Matschke, 2021. "Macroprudential Policy Interlinkages," Research Working Paper RWP 21-10, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.
    2. Julien Acalin & Alessandro Rebucci, 2020. "Global Business and Financial Cycles: A Tale of Two Capital Account Regimes," NBER Working Papers 27739, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Feng Ma & Xinjie Lu & Lu Wang & Julien Chevallier, 2021. "Global economic policy uncertainty and gold futures market volatility: Evidence from Markov regime‐switching GARCH‐MIDAS models," Journal of Forecasting, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 40(6), pages 1070-1085, September.

  3. Chang Ma & John H. Rogers & Sili Zhou, 2020. "Modern Pandemics: Recession and Recovery," International Finance Discussion Papers 1295, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).

    Cited by:

    1. An, Zidong & Liu, Dingqian & Wu, Yuzheng, 2021. "Expectation formation following pandemic events," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 200(C).
    2. Brzezinski, Michal, 2021. "The impact of past pandemics on economic and gender inequalities," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 43(C).
    3. Davide Furceri & Mr. Pragyan Deb & Nour Tawk & Mr. Jonathan David Ostry, 2020. "The Economic Effects of COVID-19 Containment Measures," IMF Working Papers 2020/158, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Mou Rani Sarker, 2021. "Labor market and unpaid works implications of COVID‐19 for Bangladeshi women," Gender, Work and Organization, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(S2), pages 597-604, July.
    5. Juan M. Morelli & Pablo Ottonello & Diego J. Perez, 2022. "Global Banks and Systemic Debt Crises," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 90(2), pages 749-798, March.
    6. Fatih GÜZEL & Melek ACAR, 2021. "The effects of epidemics on capital markets volatility: A case study of Borsa Istanbul," CES Working Papers, Centre for European Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, vol. 13(1), pages 50-70, May.
    7. Tatiana Didier & Federico Huneeus & Mauricio Larrain & Sergio L. Schmukler, 2020. "Financing Firms in Hibernation During the COVID-19 Pandemic," World Bank Publications - Reports 33611, The World Bank Group.
    8. Michal Brzezinski, 2021. "The impact of past pandemics on CO$_2$ emissions and transition to renewable energy," Papers 2104.14199, arXiv.org.
    9. Noy, Ilan & Uher, Tomáš, 2021. "Economic consequences of pre-COVID-19 epidemics: A literature review," Working Paper Series 9457, Victoria University of Wellington, School of Economics and Finance.
    10. Aksoy, Cevat & Eichengreen, Barry & Saka, Orkun, 2020. "The Political Scar of Epidemics," CEPR Discussion Papers 14879, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    11. Julio A. Carrillo & Ana Laura García, 2021. "The COVID-19 Economic Crisis in Mexico through the Lens of a Financial Conditions Index," Working Papers 2021-23, Banco de México.
    12. Patrik Barisic & Tibor Kovac, 2022. "The effectiveness of the fiscal policy response to COVID-19 through the lens of short and long run labor market effects of COVID-19 measures," Public Sector Economics, Institute of Public Finance, vol. 46(1), pages 43-81.
    13. Jan Krzysztof Solarz & Krzysztof Waliszewski, 2020. "Holistic Framework for COVID-19 Pandemic as Systemic Risk," European Research Studies Journal, European Research Studies Journal, vol. 0(Special 2), pages 340-351.
    14. Gupta, Joyeeta & Bavinck, Maarten & Ros-Tonen, Mirjam & Asubonteng, Kwabena & Bosch, Hilmer & van Ewijk, Edith & Hordijk, Michaela & Van Leynseele, Yves & Lopes Cardozo, Mieke & Miedema, Esther & Pouw, 2021. "COVID-19, poverty and inclusive development," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 145(C).
    15. Oussama Abi Younes & Sumru Altug, 2021. "The COVID-19 Shock: A Bayesian Approach," JRFM, MDPI, vol. 14(10), pages 1-15, October.

  4. Bednarek, Peter & te Kaat, Daniel Marcel & Ma, Chang & Rebucci, Alessandro, 2019. "Capital flows, real estate, and local cycles: Evidence from German cities, banks, and firms," Discussion Papers 45/2019, Deutsche Bundesbank.

    Cited by:

    1. Stefano Colonnello & Roberto Marfè & Qizhou Xiong, 2021. "Housing Yields," Working Papers 2021:21, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".
    2. Sebastian Doerr, 2020. "Housing booms, reallocation and productivity," BIS Working Papers 904, Bank for International Settlements.
    3. Maria Chiara Cavalleri & Boris Cournède & Volker Ziemann, 2019. "Housing markets and macroeconomic risks," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1555, OECD Publishing.
    4. Daniel Carvalho, 2021. "Revisiting the relationship between cross‐border capital flows and credit," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 24(2), pages 179-218, August.
    5. Daniel Carvalho & Etienne Lepers & Rogelio Jr Mercado, 2021. "Taming the "Capital Flows-Credit Nexus": A Sectoral Approach," Trinity Economics Papers tep0921, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
    6. Bednarek, Peter & Dinger, Valeriya & te Kaat, Daniel Marcel & von Westernhagen, Natalja, 2020. "Central bank funding and credit risk-taking," Discussion Papers 36/2020, Deutsche Bundesbank.

  5. Alessandro Rebucci & Chang Ma, 2019. "Capital Controls: A Survey of the New Literature," NBER Working Papers 26558, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    Cited by:

    1. Johannes Matschke, 2021. "Macroprudential Policy Interlinkages," Research Working Paper RWP 21-10, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.
    2. Philippe Bacchetta & Rachel Cordonier & Ouarda Merrouche, 2020. "The Rise in Foreign Currency Bonds: The Role of US Monetary Policy and Capital Controls," Swiss Finance Institute Research Paper Series 20-51, Swiss Finance Institute.
    3. Ma, Chang, 2020. "Financial stability, growth and macroprudential policy," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 122(C).
    4. Anusha Chari & Karlye Dilts Stedman & Kristin Forbes, 2022. "Spillovers at the Extremes: The Macroprudential Stance and Vulnerability to the Global Financial Cycle," NBER Working Papers 29670, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Marina Lovchikova & Johannes Matschke, 2021. "Capital Controls and the Global Financial Cycle," Research Working Paper RWP 21-08, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.
    6. Bilge Erten & Anton Korinek & José Antonio Ocampo, 2019. "Capital Controls: Theory and Evidence," NBER Working Papers 26447, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Eguren-Martin, Fernando & O’Neill, Cian & Sokol, Andrej & Berge, Lukas von dem, 2021. "Capital flows-at-risk: push, pull and the role of policy," Working Paper Series 2538, European Central Bank.
    8. Stephanie Schmitt-Grohé & Martín Uribe, 2020. "Deterministic Debt Cycles in Open Economies with Flow Collateral Constraints," NBER Working Papers 26613, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Schmitt-Grohé, Stephanie & Uribe, Martin, 2019. "Deterministic Debt Cycles in Open Economies with Flow Collateral Constraints," CEPR Discussion Papers 14248, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    10. Francis Breedon & Thórarinn G. Pétursson & Paolo Vitale, 2021. "The currency that came in from the cold - Capital controls and the information content of order flow," Economics wp86, Department of Economics, Central bank of Iceland.
    11. Jeanne, Olivier, 2022. "Rounding the corners of the trilemma: A simple framework," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 122(C).
    12. Daniel Carvalho & Etienne Lepers & Rogelio Jr Mercado, 2021. "Taming the "Capital Flows-Credit Nexus": A Sectoral Approach," Trinity Economics Papers tep0921, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
    13. Miguel Acosta-Henao & Laura Alfaro & Andrés Fernández, 2020. "Sticky Capital Controls," NBER Working Papers 26997, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. J. Scott Davis & Michael B. Devereux, 2019. "Capital Controls as Macro-prudential Policy in a Large Open Economy," NBER Working Papers 25710, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    15. Mr. Damiano Sandri & Mr. Francesco Grigoli & Mr. Niels-Jakob H Hansen & Katharina Bergant, 2020. "Dampening Global Financial Shocks: Can Macroprudential Regulation Help (More than Capital Controls)?," IMF Working Papers 2020/106, International Monetary Fund.
    16. Pasricha, Gurnain K., 2022. "Estimated policy rules for capital controls," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 122(C).

  6. Chang Ma, 2018. "Financial Stability, Growth, and Macroprudential Policy," 2018 Meeting Papers 3, Society for Economic Dynamics.

    Cited by:

    1. Felipe Benguria & Felipe Saffie & Hidehiko Matsumoto, 2019. "Productivity and Trade Dynamics in Sudden Stops," 2019 Meeting Papers 1378, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    2. Crespo Cuaresma, Jesus & von Schweinitz, Gregor & Wendt, Katharina, 2019. "On the empirics of reserve requirements and economic growth," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 60(C), pages 253-274.
    3. Pierre-Richard Agénor & Leonardo Gambacorta & Enisse Kharroubi & Enisse Kharroubi, 2018. "The effects of prudential regulation, financial development and financial openness on economic growth," BIS Working Papers 752, Bank for International Settlements.
    4. Marina Lovchikova & Johannes Matschke, 2021. "Capital Controls and the Global Financial Cycle," Research Working Paper RWP 21-08, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.
    5. Bilge Erten & Anton Korinek & José Antonio Ocampo, 2019. "Capital Controls: Theory and Evidence," NBER Working Papers 26447, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Chang Ma & John H. Rogers & Sili Zhou, 2019. "The Effect of the China Connect," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2019-087, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
    7. Nakatani, Ryota, 2020. "Macroprudential policy and the probability of a banking crisis," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 42(6), pages 1169-1186.
    8. Ma, Chang & Nguyen, Xuan-Hai, 2021. "Too big to fail and optimal regulation," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 747-758.
    9. Chang Ma, 2020. "Self-regulation versus government regulation: an externality view," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 58(2), pages 166-183, December.

Articles

  1. Chang Ma, 2020. "Self-regulation versus government regulation: an externality view," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 58(2), pages 166-183, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Ma, Chang & Nguyen, Xuan-Hai, 2021. "Too big to fail and optimal regulation," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 747-758.

  2. Ma, Chang, 2020. "Financial stability, growth and macroprudential policy," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 122(C).
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 12 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (9) 2018-09-24 2020-01-13 2020-02-10 2020-03-23 2020-05-11 2020-07-27 2020-08-10 2020-09-07 2021-03-22. Author is listed
  2. NEP-CNA: China (3) 2020-02-10 2020-05-11 2021-03-22. Author is listed
  3. NEP-OPM: Open Economy Macroeconomics (3) 2020-01-06 2020-05-25 2020-08-10. Author is listed
  4. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (3) 2020-01-13 2020-03-23 2020-07-27. Author is listed
  5. NEP-CFN: Corporate Finance (2) 2020-03-23 2020-05-25
  6. NEP-FDG: Financial Development & Growth (2) 2018-09-24 2021-03-22
  7. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (2) 2020-08-10 2020-09-07
  8. NEP-BAN: Banking (1) 2020-03-23
  9. NEP-CBA: Central Banking (1) 2018-09-24
  10. NEP-DGE: Dynamic General Equilibrium (1) 2018-09-24
  11. NEP-EUR: Microeconomic European Issues (1) 2020-01-13
  12. NEP-GEN: Gender (1) 2020-05-11

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