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Andreas Backhaus

Personal Details

First Name:Andreas
Middle Name:
Last Name:Backhaus
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pba1774
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
https://sites.google.com/site/andreasbackhausecon/
Twitter: @andreasshrugged

Affiliation

Bundesinstitut für Bevölkerungsforschung (BiB)
Government of Germany

Berlin, Germany
https://www.bib.bund.de/
RePEc:edi:bibgvde (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Andreas Backhaus & Elke Loichinger, 2021. "Female labour force participation in sub-Saharan Africa: A cohort analysis," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2021-60, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  2. Backhaus, Andreas, 2020. "Skills in African Labor Markets and Implications for Migration to Europe," Kiel Working Papers 2150, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW Kiel).
  3. Andreas Backhaus & Mikkel Barslund, 2019. "The Effect of Grandchildren on Grandparental Labour Supply: Evidence from Europe," EconPol Working Paper 31, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
  4. Andreas Backhaus, 2019. "Fading Legacies: Human Capital in the Aftermath of the Partitions of Poland," Working Papers 0150, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
  5. Backhaus, Andreas, 2016. "When and where do night lights reflect development?," VfS Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145949, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

Articles

  1. Andreas Backhaus & Elke Loichinger, 2022. "Female Labor Force Participation in Sub‐Saharan Africa: A Cohort Analysis," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 48(2), pages 379-411, June.
  2. Andreas Backhaus, 2022. "Pregnancies and contraceptive use in four African countries during the COVID-19 pandemic," Vienna Yearbook of Population Research, Vienna Institute of Demography (VID) of the Austrian Academy of Sciences in Vienna, vol. 20(1), pages 1-1.
  3. Backhaus, Andreas, 2022. "International travel in times of the COVID-19 pandemic: The case of German school breaks," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 44(C).
  4. Backhaus, Andreas & Barslund, Mikkel, 2021. "The effect of grandchildren on grandparental labor supply: Evidence from Europe," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 137(C).
  5. Andreas Backhaus, 2020. "Common Pitfalls in the Interpretation of COVID-19 Data and Statistics," Intereconomics: Review of European Economic Policy, Springer;ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics;Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS), vol. 55(3), pages 162-166, May.
  6. Andreas Backhaus & Inmaculada Martinez-Zarzoso & Chris Muris, 2015. "Do climate variations explain bilateral migration? A gravity model analysis," IZA Journal of Migration and Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-15, December.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Backhaus, Andreas, 2020. "Skills in African Labor Markets and Implications for Migration to Europe," Kiel Working Papers 2150, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW Kiel).

    Cited by:

    1. Lücke, Matthias & Sundberg Diez, Olivia & Jegen, Leonie & Zanker, Franzisca, 2020. "2020 MEDAM Assessment Report on Asylum and Migration Policies in Europe. European and African perspectives on asylum and migration policy: Seeking common ground," MEDAM Assessment Report on Asylum and Migration Policies in Europe, Mercator Dialogue on Asylum and Migration (MEDAM), number 233979.

  2. Andreas Backhaus & Mikkel Barslund, 2019. "The Effect of Grandchildren on Grandparental Labour Supply: Evidence from Europe," EconPol Working Paper 31, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.

    Cited by:

    1. Matthias Doepke & Anne Hannusch & Fabian Kindermann & Michèle Tertilt, 2022. "The Economics of Fertility: A New Era," Working Papers 2022-012, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    2. Huamin Chai & Rui Fu & Peter C. Coyte, 2021. "Does Unpaid Caregiving Erode Working Hours Among Middle-Aged Chinese Adults?," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 157(3), pages 977-999, October.
    3. Gema Zamarro, 2020. "Family labor participation and child care decisions: the role of grannies," SERIEs: Journal of the Spanish Economic Association, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 11(3), pages 287-312, September.
    4. Birgit Leimer & Reyn Joris van Ewijk, 2022. "Are Grandchildren Good for You? Well-Being and Health Effects of Becoming a Grandparent," Working Papers 2201, Gutenberg School of Management and Economics, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz.
    5. Christian Dudel & Elke Loichinger & Sebastian Klüsener & Harun Sulak & Mikko Myrskylä, 2021. "The extension of late working life in Germany: trends, inequalities, and the East-West divide," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2021-018, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
    6. Bertogg, Ariane & Nazio, Tiziana & Strauss, Susanne, 2021. "Work–family balance in the second half of life: Caregivers' decisions regarding retirement and working time reduction in Europe," EconStor Open Access Articles and Book Chapters, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 485-500.
    7. Barschkett, Mara & Spieß, C. Katharina & Ziege, Elena, 2021. "Does Grandparenting Pay off for the Next Generations? Intergenerational Effects of Grandparental Care," IZA Discussion Papers 14795, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    8. Francisco Cabrera-Herández & María Padilla-Romo, 2021. "Women as Caregivers: Full-time Schools and Grandmothers’ Labor Supply," Working Papers 2021-03, University of Tennessee, Department of Economics.
    9. Barschkett, Mara & Spieß, C. Katharina & Ziege, Elena, 2021. "Intergenerational Effects of Grandparental Care on Children and Parents," VfS Annual Conference 2021 (Virtual Conference): Climate Economics 242397, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    10. Mara Barschkett & C. Katharina Spiess & Elena Ziege, 2021. "Does Grandparenting Pay off for the Next Generations? Intergenerational Effects of Grandparental Care," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 1152, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    11. Mara Barschkett & C. Katharina Spieß & Elena Ziege, 2021. "Does Grandparenting Pay off for the Next Generations? Intergenerational Effects of Grandparental Care," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1975, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.

  3. Andreas Backhaus, 2019. "Fading Legacies: Human Capital in the Aftermath of the Partitions of Poland," Working Papers 0150, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).

    Cited by:

    1. Bukowski, Paweł, 2018. "How history matters for student performance: lessons from the Partitions of Poland," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 90643, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

  4. Backhaus, Andreas, 2016. "When and where do night lights reflect development?," VfS Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145949, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.

    Cited by:

    1. Amavilah, Voxi Heinrich, 2017. "Artificial nighttime lights and the “real” well-being of nations: ‘Measuring economic growth from outer space’ and welfare from right here on Earth," MPRA Paper 79744, University Library of Munich, Germany.

Articles

  1. Backhaus, Andreas, 2022. "International travel in times of the COVID-19 pandemic: The case of German school breaks," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 44(C).

    Cited by:

    1. Kumar Bhatta & Prakash Gautam & Toshinori Tanaka, 2022. "Travel Motivation during COVID-19: A Case from Nepal," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 14(12), pages 1-17, June.

  2. Backhaus, Andreas & Barslund, Mikkel, 2021. "The effect of grandchildren on grandparental labor supply: Evidence from Europe," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 137(C).
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Andreas Backhaus, 2020. "Common Pitfalls in the Interpretation of COVID-19 Data and Statistics," Intereconomics: Review of European Economic Policy, Springer;ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics;Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS), vol. 55(3), pages 162-166, May.

    Cited by:

    1. Backhaus, Andreas, 2022. "International travel in times of the COVID-19 pandemic: The case of German school breaks," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 44(C).
    2. Patrizio Vanella & Ugofilippo Basellini & Berit Lange, 2020. "Assessing Excess Mortality in Times of Pandemics Based on Principal Component Analysis of Weekly Mortality Data -- The Case of COVID-19," Working Papers axbhmxrs-o0viyh9z07m, French Institute for Demographic Studies.
    3. Ryan P. Badman & Yunxin Wu & Keigo Inukai & Rei Akaishi, 2021. "Blessing or Curse of Democracy?: Current Evidence from the Covid-19 Pandemic," Papers 2105.10865, arXiv.org.
    4. Millimet, Daniel L. & Parmeter, Christopher F., 2021. "COVID-19 Severity: A New Approach to Quantifying Global Cases and Deaths," IZA Discussion Papers 14116, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

  4. Andreas Backhaus & Inmaculada Martinez-Zarzoso & Chris Muris, 2015. "Do climate variations explain bilateral migration? A gravity model analysis," IZA Journal of Migration and Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-15, December.

    Cited by:

    1. Michel Beine & Christopher R. Parsons, 2016. "Climatic Factors as Determinants of International Migration: Redux," DEM Discussion Paper Series 16-11, Department of Economics at the University of Luxembourg.
    2. Beine, Michel & Jeusette, Lionel, 2019. "A Meta-Analysis of the Literature on Climate Change and Migration," IZA Discussion Papers 12639, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Salvatore Di Falco; Anna B. Kis; Martina Viarengo, 2021. "Cumulative Climate Shocks and Migratory Flows: Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa," CIES Research Paper series 73-2022, Centre for International Environmental Studies, The Graduate Institute.
    4. Chiara Falco & Franco Donzelli & Alessandro Olper, 2018. "Climate Change, Agriculture and Migration: A Survey," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 10(5), pages 1-21, May.
    5. Katrin Millock & Cees Withagen, 2021. "Climate and Migration," Post-Print hal-03513161, HAL.
    6. Guy Abel & Michael Brottrager & Jesus Crespo Cuaresma & Raya Muttarak, 2018. "Climate, Conflict and Forced Migration," Department of Economics Working Papers wuwp272, Vienna University of Economics and Business, Department of Economics.
    7. Michael Berlemann & Thi Xuyen Tran, 2020. "Climate-Related Hazards and Internal Migration Empirical Evidence for Rural Vietnam," Economics of Disasters and Climate Change, Springer, vol. 4(2), pages 385-409, July.
    8. Flores,Fernanda Martínez & Milusheva,Svetoslava Petkova & Reichert,Arndt Rudiger, 2021. "Climate Anomalies and International Migration : A Disaggregated Analysis for West Africa," Policy Research Working Paper Series 9664, The World Bank.
    9. Zorzeta Bakaki, 2021. "Climate Variability and Transnational Migration: A Dyadic Analysis," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 13(1), pages 1-13, January.
    10. Théo Benonnier & Katrin Millock & Vis Taraz, 2019. "Climate change, migration, and irrigation," PSE Working Papers halshs-02107098, HAL.
    11. Cristina Cattaneo & Giovanni Peri, 2015. "The Migration Response to Increasing Temperatures," NBER Working Papers 21622, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Martinez-Zarzoso, Inmaculada, 2017. "Searching for grouped patterns of heterogeneity in the climate-migration link," University of Göttingen Working Papers in Economics 321, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    13. Michael Landesmann & Isilda Mara, 2021. "Migration from Africa, the Middle East and European Neighbouring Countries to the EU: An Augmented Gravity Modelling Approach," wiiw Working Papers 198, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    14. Michal Burzynski & Christoph Deuster & Frédéric Docquier & Jaime de Melo, 2019. "Climate Change, Inequality, and Human Migration," Working Papers hal-02394518, HAL.
    15. Jasmin Gröschl & Thomas Steinwachs, 2017. "Do Natural Hazards Cause International Migration?," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 63(4), pages 445-480.
    16. Salvatore Di Falco & Anna B. Kis & Martina Viarengo, 2022. "Cumulative Climate Shocks and Migratory Flows: Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa," CESifo Working Paper Series 9582, CESifo.
    17. Wesselbaum Dennis, 2017. "Socioeconomic Driving Forces of International Migration," Journal of Globalization and Development, De Gruyter, vol. 8(2), pages 1-17, December.
    18. Michael Berlemann & Max Friedrich Steinhardt, 2017. "Climate Change, Natural Disasters, and Migration—a Survey of the Empirical Evidence," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 63(4), pages 353-385.
    19. Michel BEINE & Lionel JEUSETTE, 2021. "A Meta-analysis of the Literature on Climate Change and Migration," JODE - Journal of Demographic Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 87(3), pages 293-344, September.
    20. Michael P. Cameron, 2017. "Climate Change, Internal Migration and the Future Spatial Distribution of Population: A Case Study of New Zealand," Working Papers in Economics 17/03, University of Waikato.
    21. Simone Bertolia & Frédéric Docquier & Hillel Rapoport & Ilse Ruyssen, 2020. "Weather Shocks and Migration Intentions in Western Africa: Insights from a Multilevel Analysis," Working Papers 2020-02, CEPII research center.
    22. Michał Burzyński & Frédéric DOCQUIER & Hendrik SCHEEWEL, 2021. "The Geography of Climate Migration," JODE - Journal of Demographic Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 87(3), pages 345-381, September.
    23. Dimitri Defrance & Esther Delesalle & Flore Gubert, 2020. "Is migration drought-induced in Mali? An empirical analysis using panel data on Malian localities over the 1987-2009 period," LIDAM Discussion Papers IRES 2020003, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
    24. Amelia Aburn & Dennis Wesselbaum, 2017. "Gone with the Wind: International Migration," Working Papers 1708, University of Otago, Department of Economics, revised Apr 2017.
    25. Marc Helbling & Daniel Meierrieks, 2021. "How climate change leads to emigration: Conditional and long‐run effects," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 25(4), pages 2323-2349, November.
    26. Robert M. Beyer & Jacob Schewe & Hermann Lotze-Campen, 2022. "Gravity models do not explain, and cannot predict, international migration dynamics," Palgrave Communications, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 9(1), pages 1-10, December.
    27. Helbling, Marc & Auer, Daniel & Meierrieks, Daniel & Mistry, Malcolm & Schaub, Max, 2021. "Climate change literacy and migration potential: micro-level evidence from Africa," EconStor Open Access Articles and Book Chapters, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics.
    28. Catherine Abiola O. Akinbami, 2021. "Migration and Climate Change Impacts on Rural Entrepreneurs in Nigeria: A Gender Perspective," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 13(16), pages 1-17, August.
    29. Koji Murayama & Jun Nagayasu, 2021. "Toward Coexistence of Immigrants and Local People in Japan: Implications from Spatial Assimilation Theory," Sustainability, MDPI, vol. 13(7), pages 1-16, March.
    30. Cosimo Beverelli, 2022. "Pull factors for migration: The impact of migrant integration policies," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 34(1), pages 171-191, March.
    31. Barbora Šedová & Lucia Čizmaziová & Athene Cook, 2021. "A meta-analysis of climate migration literature," CEPA Discussion Papers 29, Center for Economic Policy Analysis.
    32. Florent MCISAAC & Daniel BASTIDAS, 2019. "Reaching Brazil's Nationally Determined Contributions: An Assessment of the Key Transitions in Final Demand and Employment," Working Paper 911644f9-625d-496f-8ecf-8, Agence française de développement.
    33. Cosimo Beverelli, 2020. "Migrant Integration Policies and Bilateral Migration," RSCAS Working Papers 2020/08, European University Institute.
    34. Thomas Steinwachs, 2019. "Eine Frage der Geographie: Räumliche Dimensionen von Handel, Migration und Wachstum," ifo Beiträge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 81.
    35. Di Falco, Salvatore & Kis, Anna B. & Viarengo, Martina, 2022. "Cumulative Climate Shocks and Migratory Flows: Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa," IZA Discussion Papers 15084, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

More information

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Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 4 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-AFR: Africa (1) 2021-04-05. Author is listed
  2. NEP-AGE: Economics of Ageing (1) 2019-11-11. Author is listed
  3. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (1) 2019-11-11. Author is listed
  4. NEP-DEV: Development (1) 2021-04-05. Author is listed
  5. NEP-EUR: Microeconomic European Issues (1) 2019-11-11. Author is listed
  6. NEP-GRO: Economic Growth (1) 2019-04-15. Author is listed
  7. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (1) 2019-11-11. Author is listed
  8. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (1) 2019-04-15. Author is listed
  9. NEP-INT: International Trade (1) 2020-06-08. Author is listed
  10. NEP-MIG: Economics of Human Migration (1) 2020-06-08. Author is listed

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