IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/zbw/cegedp/321.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Searching for grouped patterns of heterogeneity in the climate-migration link

Author

Listed:
  • Martinez-Zarzoso, Inmaculada

Abstract

This paper uses international migration data and climate variables in a multi-country setting to investigate the extent to which international migration can be explained by changes in the local climate and whether this relationship varies between groups of countries. Moreover, the primary focus is to further investigate the differential effect found by Cattaneo and Peri (2016) for countries with different income levels using a high-frequency dataset. The idea being that country grouping is considered to be data driven, instead of exogenously decided. The estimation technique used to endogenously group the countries of origin is based on the group-mean fixedeffects (GFE) estimator proposed by Bonhomme and Manresa (2015), which allows us to group the origin countries according to the data generation process. The main results indicate that an increasing average local temperature is associated with an increase in that country's emigration rate, on average, but the effect differs between groups. The results are driven by a group of countries mainly located in Sub-Saharan Africa and Central Asia; however, no statistically significant association is found between the average amount of local precipitation and that country's rate of emigration.

Suggested Citation

  • Martinez-Zarzoso, Inmaculada, 2017. "Searching for grouped patterns of heterogeneity in the climate-migration link," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 321, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:cegedp:321
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/168581/1/898418690.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Barrios, Salvador & Bertinelli, Luisito & Strobl, Eric, 2006. "Climatic change and rural-urban migration: The case of sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(3), pages 357-371, November.
    2. Ariel R. Belasen & Solomon W. Polachek, 2013. "Natural disasters and migration," Chapters,in: International Handbook on the Economics of Migration, chapter 17, pages 309-330 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Andreas Backhaus & Inmaculada Martinez-Zarzoso & Chris Muris, 2015. "Do climate variations explain bilateral migration? A gravity model analysis," IZA Journal of Migration and Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-15, December.
    4. Cattaneo, Cristina & Peri, Giovanni, 2016. "The migration response to increasing temperatures," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 122(C), pages 127-146.
    5. Marchiori, Luca & Maystadt, Jean-François & Schumacher, Ingmar, 2012. "The impact of weather anomalies on migration in sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 63(3), pages 355-374.
    6. Melissa Dell & Benjamin F. Jones & Benjamin A. Olken, 2014. "What Do We Learn from the Weather? The New Climate-Economy Literature," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 52(3), pages 740-798, September.
    7. Rafael Reuveny & Will H. Moore, 2009. "Does Environmental Degradation Influence Migration? Emigration to Developed Countries in the Late 1980s and 1990s," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 90(3), pages 461-479, September.
    8. Drabo, Alassane & Mbaye, Linguère Mously, 2015. "Natural disasters, migration and education: an empirical analysis in developing countries," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 20(6), pages 767-796, December.
    9. Choumert, Johanna & Motel, Pascale Combes & Millock, Katrin, 2015. "Climate change mitigation and adaptation in developing and transition countries: introduction to the special issue," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 20(4), pages 425-433, August.
    10. Michel Beine & Christopher Parsons, 2015. "Climatic Factors as Determinants of International Migration," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 117(2), pages 723-767, April.
    11. Katrin Millock, 2015. "Migration and Environment," Annual Review of Resource Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 7(1), pages 35-60, October.
    12. Coniglio, Nicola D. & Pesce, Giovanni, 2015. "Climate variability and international migration: an empirical analysis," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 20(04), pages 434-468, August.
    13. Katrin Millock, 2015. "Migration and Environment," Post-Print halshs-01302611, HAL.
    14. Melissa Dell & Benjamin F. Jones & Benjamin A. Olken, 2012. "Temperature Shocks and Economic Growth: Evidence from the Last Half Century," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 4(3), pages 66-95, July.
    15. Katrin Millock, 2015. "Migration and Environment," PSE - Labex "OSE-Ouvrir la Science Economique" halshs-01302611, HAL.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    international migration; climate change; developing countries; GFE; group heterogeneity;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:zbw:cegedp:321. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/cdgoede.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.