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Migration and Environment

Author

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  • Katrin Millock

    () (Paris School of Economics–CNRS, Centre d’Economie de la Sorbonne, 75647 Paris Cedex 13, France)

Abstract

The concept of environmental migrants occurs frequently in the policy debate, in particular with regard to climate change and the incidence of such migration in low-income countries. This article reviews the economic studies of environmentally induced migration. It includes recent empirical analyses that try to link environmental change to migration flows and the spatial distribution of population. A consensus seems to emerge that there is little likelihood of large increases in international migration flows due to climate variability. The evidence to date shows that regional migration will be affected, however, either on the African continent or internally, within country borders. Theoretically, environmentally induced migration can be analyzed using different frameworks: the classical Harris-Todaro model of rural-urban migration, new economic geography models, models grounded in environmental economics of pollution externalities with free factor mobility, and the new economics of labor migration. I review some of the latest attempts to analyze environmentally induced migration theoretically and the policy-relevant conclusions that can be drawn.

Suggested Citation

  • Katrin Millock, 2015. "Migration and Environment," Annual Review of Resource Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 7(1), pages 35-60, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:anr:reseco:v:7:y:2015:p:35-60
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    File URL: http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev-resource-100814-125031
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Michel Beine & Lionel Jeusette, 2018. "A Meta-Analysis of the Literature on Climate Change and Migration," CREA Discussion Paper Series 18-05, Center for Research in Economic Analysis, University of Luxembourg.
    2. Théo Benonnier & Katrin Millock & Vis Taraz, 2019. "Climate change, migration, and irrigation," PSE Working Papers halshs-02107098, HAL.
    3. Martinez-Zarzoso, Inmaculada, 2017. "Searching for grouped patterns of heterogeneity in the climate-migration link," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 321, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    4. Charles F Mason, 2017. "Climate Change and Migration: A Dynamic Model," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 63(4), pages 421-444.
    5. Alem, Yonas & Maurel, Mathilde & Millock, Katrin, 2016. "Migration as an Adaptation Strategy to Weather Variability: An Instrumental Variables Probit Analysis," Working Papers in Economics 665, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    6. Ricciuti Roberto & Baronchelli Adelaide, 2018. "Climate change, rice production, and migration in Vietnamese households," WIDER Working Paper Series 86, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    7. repec:eee:wdevel:v:112:y:2018:i:c:p:205-219 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Michel Beine & Ilan Noy & Christopher Parsons, 2019. "Climate Change, Migration and Voice - An Explanation for the Immobility Paradox," CREA Discussion Paper Series 19-14, Center for Research in Economic Analysis, University of Luxembourg.
    9. Michel Beine & Lionel Jeusette, 2018. "A Meta-Analysis of the Literature on Climate Change and Migration," CREA Discussion Paper Series 18-05, Center for Research in Economic Analysis, University of Luxembourg.
    10. Yonas Alem & Mathilde Maurel & Katrin Millock, 2016. "Migration as an Adaptation Strategy to Weather Variability: An Instrumental Variables Probit Analysis," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) hal-01955941, HAL.
    11. Vicente Ruiz, 2017. "Do climatic events influence internal migration? Evidence from Mexico," Working Papers 2017.19, FAERE - French Association of Environmental and Resource Economists.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    climate change; environment; migration; rainfall; temperature shocks;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • Q50 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - General
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

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