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Do climate variations explain bilateral migration? A gravity model analysis

Author

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  • Andreas Backhaus

    ()

  • Inmaculada Martinez-Zarzoso

    ()

  • Chris Muris

    ()

Abstract

F22, Q54 Copyright Backhaus et al.; licensee Springer. 2015

Suggested Citation

  • Andreas Backhaus & Inmaculada Martinez-Zarzoso & Chris Muris, 2015. "Do climate variations explain bilateral migration? A gravity model analysis," IZA Journal of Migration and Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-15, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:izamig:v:4:y:2015:i:1:p:1-15:10.1186/s40176-014-0026-3
    DOI: 10.1186/s40176-014-0026-3
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1186/s40176-014-0026-3
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ilse Ruyssen & Gerdie Everaert & Glenn Rayp, 2014. "Determinants and dynamics of migration to OECD countries in a three-dimensional panel framework," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 46(1), pages 175-197, February.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Michel Beine & Christopher R. Parsons, 2016. "Climatic Factors as Determinants of International Migration: Redux," CREA Discussion Paper Series 16-11, Center for Research in Economic Analysis, University of Luxembourg.
    2. Michel Beine & Lionel Jeusette, 2018. "A Meta-Analysis of the Literature on Climate Change and Migration," CREA Discussion Paper Series 18-05, Center for Research in Economic Analysis, University of Luxembourg.
    3. Cattaneo, Cristina & Peri, Giovanni, 2016. "The migration response to increasing temperatures," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 122(C), pages 127-146.
    4. repec:oup:cesifo:v:63:y:2017:i:4:p:445-480. is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Amelia Aburn & Dennis Wesselbaum, 2017. "Gone with the Wind: International Migration," Working Papers 1708, University of Otago, Department of Economics, revised Apr 2017.
    6. Jasmin Gröschl & Thomas Steinwachs, 2017. "Do Natural Hazards Cause International Migration?," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 63(4), pages 445-480.
    7. Martinez-Zarzoso, Inmaculada, 2017. "Searching for grouped patterns of heterogeneity in the climate-migration link," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 321, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    8. repec:oup:cesifo:v:63:y:2017:i:4:p:353-385. is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Michael P. Cameron, 2017. "Climate Change, Internal Migration and the Future Spatial Distribution of Population: A Case Study of New Zealand," Working Papers in Economics 17/03, University of Waikato.
    10. repec:oup:cesifo:v:63:y:2017:i:4:p:386-402. is not listed on IDEAS
    11. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:5:p:1405-:d:144280 is not listed on IDEAS

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