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Mobility and innovation: A cross-country comparison in the video games industry

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  • Storz, Cornelia
  • Riboldazzi, Federico
  • John, Moritz

Abstract

Open labour markets are often seen as a precondition for innovation, particularly for new industries. However, this view ignores two core findings of the economic systems literature: first, that mobility patterns are institutional microsystems that need to be complementary to other institutions in the labour market; and second, that new industries may be characterised by incremental and complex innovation. Based on these considerations, we ask how mobility affects innovation in the video games industry in the US and Japan. We find that inter-firm mobility is beneficial for innovation in the US, but has negative effects in Japan. We further find that inter-functional mobility is beneficial for innovation in both countries. Our analysis is based on career histories from the video games industry in the US and Japan. We present an empirical study based on the game development of 815 video games and the careers of 28,426 video game developers who were involved in the development of games released between 1999 and 2009.

Suggested Citation

  • Storz, Cornelia & Riboldazzi, Federico & John, Moritz, 2015. "Mobility and innovation: A cross-country comparison in the video games industry," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(1), pages 121-137.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:respol:v:44:y:2015:i:1:p:121-137
    DOI: 10.1016/j.respol.2014.07.015
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    Cited by:

    1. Neffke, Frank M.H. & Otto, Anne & Weyh, Antje, 2017. "Inter-industry labor flows," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 142(C), pages 275-292.
    2. repec:spr:elmark:v:27:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s12525-016-0244-z is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Björn Remneland Wikhamn & Alexander Styhre & Jan Ljungberg & Anna Maria Szczepanska, 2016. "Exploration Vs. Exploitation And How Video Game Developers Are Able To Combine The Two," International Journal of Innovation Management (ijim), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 20(06), pages 1-20, August.
    4. Jukka Ruohonen & Sami Hyrynsalmi, 0. "Evaluating the use of internet search volumes for time series modeling of sales in the video game industry," Electronic Markets, Springer;IIM University of St. Gallen, vol. 0, pages 1-20.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Labour market; Innovation; Mobility; Comparison of economic systems;

    JEL classification:

    • J4 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets
    • J6 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers
    • O3 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights
    • P5 - Economic Systems - - Comparative Economic Systems

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